How to freeze homemade cookies

When you freeze cookies and dough for your holiday baking, you can enjoy stress-free schedules. These come in handy during holiday periods when you need a lot of time for activities such as buy, travel, and celebrate. Our easy-to-follow steps on how to freeze cookies and cookie dough and bake later help you freeze and bake when you are in a time crunch.

1. What type of cookies to freeze?

You can freeze almost every type of cookies cutouts, slice-bake, biscotti, and drop cookies. Avoid freezing cookies such as meringues that are decorated, filled, or have a delicate structure. You should also avoid freezing cookies that are coated with chocolate. A chocolate-coated cookie tends to form a boom, which is a white-colored layer on the surface when you freeze it.

2. How to freeze cookies?

After you bake your cookies, allow them to cool completely in the room temperature. Place these cooled cookies in a single line on a baking sheet lined with parchment or wax paper. You can stack multiple layers of cookies provided they are separated by parchment or wax paper. Store the lined up cookies in a freezer friendly zip lock storage bag. Before you close the bag, squeeze out any extra air in the bag and place it in the freezer. You can also label these bags with a name and date when you have many different types of cookies to freeze.

Whenever you like to taste the cookie, grab the cookies from the freezer and place it outside the freezer for a while to get rid of the coldness in the cookies. Allow it to attain the room temperature before you eat. You can also heat the frozen cookies in a microwave in a 10-second interval. You need to avoid heating decorated cookies.

3. How to freeze a cookie dough?

It is preferable to freeze a cookie dough instead of freezing the baked cookies. Frozen cookie dough allows you to make fresh homemade soft cookies with a nice smell, any time you need it. You can place the baked cookies or roll or cut the cookie dough in paper sheets lined with wax and place them in the freezer. You need to freeze them for an hour or so until it becomes firm hard. You can then transfer the frozen unbaked cookies or cookie dough in an airtight container or storage bag and freeze it. You can label this cookie dough or cookies when you have many doughs that look similar. You can store cookies or cookie dough in the freezer for up to 6 months, provided they are wrapped and stored properly.

However, if you need to complete the entire task of baking cookies in one shot, you need to bake the cookies and freeze them.

6 mistakes to avoid when freezing cookie dough.

1. Freezing a wrong cookie dough.

You can freeze all types of cookie dough except thin and delicate cookies such as lace, Florentines, pizzelle. The doughs for these cookies have watery batters and do not freeze well, whether they are baked or unbaked. It is preferable to make fresh batters for these types of cookies.

2. Not freezing cookie dough in the right method.

Depending upon the kind of cookie dough, you need to follow a different method to freeze it.

Drop cookie doughs should be rolled into balls on a baking sheet and frozen until it is firm and transfer it to an airtight container or a freezer bag.

Slice and bake doughs should be rolled into logs, tightly wrapped in waxed sheets, and placed in the freezer.

Cut out doughs can be shaped into discs, layered one upon the other, and separated by wax sheets. You can place these stacked discs in a plastic wrap and transfer to an airtight container.

3. Freezing cookies rolled in granulated or powdered sugar.

Freezing cookies that are rolled in sugar or granules make the sugar to clump. It forms an unpleasant coating on the cookies and an eyesore. To prevent this, you can roll your cookies on powdered sugar right before you pick them to eat.

4. Not baking for additional time.

Though you can bake frozen balls of drop cookies, slice and bake and cutout cookie doughs need to be placed outside the room temperature for a short while before you bake. Colder doughs need more time to bake, and you need to allow it to bake for few more minutes than the suggested baking time. Warming the dough helps you to get better-baked cookies when you use cold doughs.

5. Not freezing doughs first.

You need to freeze your baked cookies or cookie dough until it is firm using a baking sheet wax before you transfer them to a freezer bag or an airtight container. Otherwise, it might end up in a block of stuck cookies or cookie dough when you grab them out.

6. Thawing baked cookies in the same frozen containers.

When you thaw the baked cookies in the same container, you froze them, the lingering condensation from the frozen containers deposits on cookies, and make them soggy. You need to take out frozen baked cookies containers to separate plates lined with paper towels and place them at room temperature.

These simple tips enable you to create great homemade cookies and give you a lot of time for other holiday activities. You can grab out your cookies any time you need a variety of cookies within minutes.