Cilantro and Coriander: A Home Gardener’s Guide

Now available in eBook And Paperback — Cilantro and Coriander: A Home Gardener’s Guide

Writing and The Written Word

— Now Available In Paperback And eBook Formats—

Book Description

Known for their leaves, seeds, and unique aroma, cilantro, and coriander can bring your garden and meals to life! Tracing back to almost 5000 BC, cilantro leaves and coriander seeds are one of the oldest herbs and spices in the world, thus making it one of the most diverse herbs and spices to produce and utilize, especially within your garden or in your food! This home gardeners guide is bursting with straightforward information that makes growing, using, and preserving cilantro and coriander enjoyable and trouble-free, so anyone can get the full potential of this infamous herb and spice all year round. From gardeners to herb enthusiasts, even for everyone in between, this practical guide will provide all its readers with a green thumb help with cultivating and maintaining a thriving and fragrant garden…

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Poetry – THE STREAM

Writing and The Written Word

I know a stream
Than which no lovelier flows.
Its banks a-gleam
With yarrow and wild rose,
Singing it goes
And shining through my dream.

Its waters glide
Beneath the basking noon,
A magic tide
That keeps perpetual June.

There the light sleeps
Unstirred by any storm;
The wild mouse creeps
Through tall weeds hushed and warm;
And the shy snipe,
Alighting unafraid;
With sudden pipe
Awakes the dreaming shade.

So long ago!
Still, still my memory hears
Its silver flow
Across the sundering years,—
Its roses glow,
Ah, through what longing tears!

— Charles G. D. Roberts

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Poetry – WHEN THE CLOUD COMES DOWN THE MOUNTAIN

Writing and The Written Word

When the cloud comes down the mountain,
And the rain is loud on the leaves,
And the slim flies gather for shelter
Under my cabin eaves,

Then my heart goes out to earth,
With the swollen brook runs free,
Drinks life with the drenched brown roots,
And climbs with the sap in the tree.

— Charles G. D. Roberts

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Nasturtium

Genus:

  • Tropaeolum majus

LIFECYCLE:

  • Nasturtiums are annual

Height:

  • 12 inches for a bush, 72 inches for vines

Spread:

  • 18 inches for bush

Description:

  • Distinctive, blue-green circular leaves are held up on fleshy stems. These annuals come in a variety of types ranging from compact bushes to long-spreading vines. They make an eye-catching addition to any garden. In addition, they have large attractive blooms that range in color from palest yellows, pinks, and apricots to deep, rich yellows, oranges, and burgundy. The vining types are great in hanging planters, window boxes, or for use on trellises and fences.

Ease of care:

  • Easy

How to grow:

  • Plant in full sun to partial shade in average to poor, moist soil.

Propagation:

  • By seed in late spring. They’re large and can be planted individually where the plants are going to grow

Pests:

  • Aphids love nasturtiums, so be on the lookout for them.

Uses:

  • Fresh leaves and flowers-salads
  • Fresh flowers-floral arrangements
  • Unripe seeds and flower buds-pickled for salads

Preservation:

  • Pickle unripe seeds in vinegar and use them in salads.

Recipe – Beef Burgundy

Beef Burgundy is a hearty beef stew, usually braised, which make an excellent lunch or dinner meal. Especially during the cooler of autumn, winter, and early spring.

Beef Burgundy Ingredients

  • 1 boneless beef sirloin steak, ½-inch thick, trimmed, cut into 1/2-inch pieces (about 3 pounds)
  • ½ cup all-purpose flour
  • 4 slices uncooked bacon, diced
  • 3 cups Burgundy wine or beef broth
  • 2 medium carrots, diced
  • 1 teaspoon dried marjoram leaves
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme leaves
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon Black pepper
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 2 tablespoons cooking oil
  • 20 to 24 fresh pearl onions
  • 8 small new red potatoes, quartered 
  • 8 to 10 mushrooms, sliced
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced

Beef Burgundy Directions

  • Coat beef with flour, shaking off excess; set aside.
  • Cook and stir bacon in a 5-quart Dutch oven over medium-high heat until partially cooked.
  • Add half of the beef to bacon; brown over medium-high heat.
  • Remove with slotted spoon; set aside.
  • Brown remaining beef.
  • Pour off drippings.
  • Return beef and bacon to Dutch oven.
  • Stir in wine, carrots, marjoram, thyme, salt, pepper to taste and bay leaf.
  • Bring to a boil over high heat.
  • Reduce heat to low.
  • Cover; simmer 10 minutes. 
  • Meanwhile, heat oil in a large saucepan over medium-high heat.
  • Cook and stir onions, potatoes, mushrooms and garlic about 10 minutes.
  • Add to Dutch oven.
  • Cover; simmer 50 minutes or until meat is fork-tender.
  • Remove and discard bay leaf. 

Servings

  • Makes 10 to 12 servings

Growing Zucchini And Summer Squash: A Home Gardener’s Guide

Writing and The Written Word

Thinking about growing some zucchini and summer squash and
are not sure where to get started, well, this book will get you on our way.
This concise gardening guide provides the essentials any home gardener will
need to grow zucchini and summer squash at home for their tables regardless of how
large or small garden patch is or if it just a tiny container garden. This guide covers topics such which quash to
choose, garden considerations, and how to handle the more common pitfalls and
problems of growing Zucchini and Summer Squash.

Growing Zucchini And Summer Squash: A HOME GARDENER’S GUIDE ON AMAZON

Amazon Author Page

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Lime Yogurt Gelatin Dessert

This I an easy dessert which will actually give your dessert some health benefits. So, who said dessert is bad for you,–not always true.

Lime Yogurt Gelatin Ingredients

Gelatin

  • 1 package unflavored gelatin (1 tablespoon / 0.3 oz)
  • 1 package sugar-free lime gelatin (0.6 oz / 17g)
  • ½ cup (120 ml) cold water  
  • 3 ½ cups boiling water
  • 3/4 cup (180 ml) plain, full-fat or Greek yogurt
  • 3/4 cup (180 ml) heavy cream

Garnish

  • Whipped cream (optional)
  • Slice of Lime per serving (optional)

Lime Yogurt Gelatin Directions

  • Measure, cover, and let the yogurt warm to about room temperature.
  • Bloom your gelatin by putting spreading both packets evenly over the cold water and letting the gelatin soften. I usually do this in the mixing bowl where I intend to dissolve the gelatin with hot water.
  • Heat the remaining water.  To speed up preparation and reduce the supervision required, I usually heat my water in the microwave in a large microwave-safe glass measuring cup.
  • Combine the boiling water with the bloomed gelatin and stir until completely dissolved.
  • Set aside the dissolved gelatin let the gelatin to cool down to warm room temperature; about 30 minutes. Do not refrigerate the gelatin or the gelatin may set; especially, you get distracted by life for a few more minutes than planned.
  • When the gelatin mixture cold to room temperature, whisk in the yogurt until evenly combined.
  • Divide the mixture into serving contains or an appropriately sized serving dish if serving the gelatin family-style.
  • Refrigerate the gelatin until set, about 3 hours or more.
  • When serving, If desired, garnish with whipping cream and a slice of lime.

Serve

  • The gelatin is best served cold.

Servings:

  • Makes 11-12 half-cup servings

Alternatives

  • For richer gelatin replace yogurt with 3/4 cup (180 ml) plain, full-fat or Greek yogurt and 3/4 cup (180 ml) heavy cream, mixed together.
  • You make this work with any flavor gelatin, which your family likes, but you may also want to change the garnish, as well.

Cook’s Notes

  1. We make our own yogurt and the way I make yogurt, the yogurt is nearly as thick as Greek yogurt.
  2. If you want to skip the unflavored gelatin, then reduce the hot water from 3 ½ cups to 2 ¾ cups and you should be fine.  I use the because I want the full batch and the unflavored gelatin also adds a measure of safety, ensuring the gelatin will set and be firm.
  3. It is important to let the dissolved gelatin cool, so don’t run it.  If the gelatin is too heat it will kill the living yogurt culture, which gives this dessert some health benefits.
  4. We always leave plenty of space at the top of the dish to have room for lots of whipped cream.