Benefits Of Having Birdbaths In Your Yard

Birdbaths are not only meant to create attractive focal points, but also attract a plethora of woodland creatures like birds, butterflies, and insects that are beneficial to your backyard. 

This is undoubtedly the easiest and efficient way to entice wildlife to your garden when compared to building birdhouses or planting beautiful flowers. 

Not convinced yet? Among the benefits of adding a few birdbaths to your backyard garden and landscape.

Benefits Of Adding Birdbaths

1. Provide birds with a source of water

Birds need water for drinking and bathing, especially during the winter season when the natural water supplies have been subjected to freezing points, and there’s limited access to running water. You can help the birds with heated birdbaths, as this type prevents water from freezing.

2.Attracts Other Wildlife

If you are an animal lover, then birdbaths will be your friend because birdbaths will attract other animals such as squirrels and frogs who may be in need of a drink during the summer heat or if you keep your birdbath free of ice in the winter even in the cooler months.

Over the past couple years I have made a couple bird friends, who when I’m cultivating my garden or I’m running with my shovel, will come running and wait nearby on another garden bed or on the fence to swoop in and scarf up any little grubs, bugs, or worms which I might uncover while cultivating my garden beds, which also helps to reduce pests in the garden with the added benefit of some entertainment while you’re working on it.

3. Improve aeration and control pests 

Birdbaths attract different types of birds that feed on various pests, such as slugs, caterpillars, and grasshoppers — which threaten the fruits and vegetables in your garden. This means fewer destructive insects and, of course, less pesticide application. 

Besides the pest control benefit, birds also play an essential role in boosting soil aeration, alleviating compaction through digging the garden in search of worms. When soil is properly aerated, roots will grow deeply for stronger, more vigorous lawn, crops, and flowers. 

You also get to attract wasps, which feed on cabbage worms that destroy crops. 

4. Promote pollination

Birdbaths can attract butterflies and bees — insects known as excellent pollinators. If you grow fruits, vegetables, and flowers, you’ll want to have a few birdbaths placed in inviting locations in your garden.

5. ReduceD Bird Damage In Your Vegetable Garden

One thing that I have noticed, is that when I keep my birdbaths filled and clean, my vegetable garden suffers less bird damage. When they have plenty to drink in hot weather, for example, they don’t raid my ripening tomatoes nearly as much, if at all. Same goes for my fruit trees, however, with fruit trees there’s always some bird loss from birds if you don’t protect your trees. I don’t mind if the birds get a few, because I always have more colorful birds around my backyard and trees, even in winter.

6. Support kids learning

Nature is beautiful, but, unfortunately, the connection kids have with nature isn’t really that strong as past generations before most people lived in cities and technology took over. By attracting different types of birds, you create an entertaining environment that present kids with a new opportunity to learn valuable lessons. For example, they can learn how to identify different types of birds, their habits, as well as migratory routes

Conclusion

There you have it! With the benefits of birdbaths above, it’s fair to say having one or more in your backyard is worth it.

Related References

Quick Guide to Proper Bird Bath Placement

Sometimes birds have a hard time getting fresh and clean water. A birdbath could come in handy in such instances. It could also be great if you love watching birds. Water has been proven to attract more bird species than feeders. However, getting a birdbath is the first step. You need to place the birdbath properly to ensure it serves its purpose perfectly. Here are some quick bird bath placement tips to consider. 

How to place a birdbath

1.      Place near a window or where you can see/watch birds easily

  • Although you may be getting a birdbath solely for providing birds with clean, fresh, water, you’ll definitely enjoy watching the birds. So, place the birdbath near your field of sight, preferably, somewhere you can see from indoors. This will, of course, depend on the design of your house as well as your tastes and preferences. For instance, if you have outdoor space in your home that you frequent when relaxing, consider placing your birdbath in front of such an area.


2. Place on a pedestal away from predators/danger

  • Birdbaths should be away from areas where cats, among other predators, can hide and pounce on the birds. Ideally, the birdbath should be out in the open and placed on a pedestal where birds can see predators approaching. A pedestal is also a safe distance away from the ground where children can’t reach, and you can see the birdbath easily.

3. Have an escape route

  • Since it’s impossible to eliminate predators, among other things that can scare birds away, you should think about an escape route. The birdbath should be placed where there is a clear line of escape into the sky or nearby branches since wet birds have a shorter flying range. 

4. Locate near a clean and fresh source of water

  • Birdbaths should be near a garden hose. Since one of the reasons for having a birdbath is providing clean and fresh water to birds, a location that is far from your house or a water source isn’t ideal. It should be easy for you to change the water after a few days, even daily during hot weather. A nearby water source also makes cleaning easy. 

5. Consider climate

  • Last, but not least, you need to consider the climate in your area. If you live in northern regions which are generally cold, choose a sunny spot so that the sun can keep the water warm during chilly days. Such a location will also ensure the water doesn’t freeze during winter. If you live in southern regions which are usually hot, consider a spot with some shade to keep the water cool during hot days.

THE BLUEBIRD

Writing and The Written Word

I know the song that the bluebird is singing,
Out in the apple-tree where he is swinging;
Brave little fellow, the skies may look dreary;
Nothing cares he while his heart is so cheery.

Hark! how the music leaps out from his throat,
Hark! was there ever so merry a note?
Listen awhile and you’ll hear what he’s saying,
Up in the apple-tree swinging and swaying.

“Dear little blossoms down under the snow,
You must be weary of winter, I know;
Hark, while I sing you a message of cheer;
Summer is coming and spring-time is here!

“Little white snowdrop! I pray you arise;
Bright yellow crocus! come, open your eyes;
Sweet little violets, hid from the cold,
Put on your mantles of purple and gold;
Daffodils! daffodils! say, do you hear?—
Summer is coming and spring-time is here!”

–Emily Huntington Miller

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THERE CAME TO MY WINDOW

Writing and The Written Word

There came to my window one morning in Spring
A sweet little Robin; she came there to sing.
The tune that she sang, it was prettier far
Than any I heard on the flute or guitar.

Her wings she was spreading to soar far away,
Then resting a moment seemed sweetly to say:
“Oh happy, how happy the world seems to be!
Awake, Little Girl and be happy with me!”

But just as she finished her beautiful song,
A thoughtless young man with a gun came along.
He killed and he carried my sweet bird away,
She no more will sing at the dawn of the day.

— Anonymous

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The Fox

Writing and The Written Word

A fox looked at his shadow at sunrise and said, “I will have a camel for lunch today.” And all morning he went about looking for camels. But at noon he saw his shadow again—and he said, “A mouse will do.”

— Khalil Gibran

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THE NIGHTINGALE

Writing and The Written Word

As it fell upon a day
In the merry month of May,
Sitting in a pleasant shade
Which a grove of myrtles made,
Beasts did leap and birds did sing,
Trees did grow and plants did spring,
Every thing did banish moan
Save the Nightingale alone.
She, poor bird, as all forlorn,
Lean’d her breast against a thorn,
And there sung the dolefullest ditty,
That to hear it was great pity.
Fie, fie, fie, now would she cry;
Tereu, tereu, by and by:
That to hear her so complain
Scarce I could from tears refrain;
For her griefs so lively shown
Made me think upon mine own.
—Ah! thought I, thou mourn’st in vain,
None takes pity on thy pain:
Senseless trees, they cannot hear thee,
Ruthless beasts, they will not cheer thee;
King Pandion, he is dead,
All thy friends are lapp’d in lead:
All thy fellow…

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“HOW IS THE WEA-THER?”

Writing and The Written Word

Cold win-ter has come,
And the cru-el winds blow—
The trees are all leaf-less and brown;
These two pret-ty rob-ins,
Oh, where shall they go
To shel-ter their lit-tle brown heads from the snow?
Just look at the flakes com-ing down.

But see, they have found a snug shel-ter at last,
And hark, how they talk, while the storm whis-tles past:

Says Pol-ly to Dick-y,
“You’re near-est the door,
And you are the gen-tle-man, too:
Just peep out and see
When the storm will be o’er;
Be-cause, if the wea-ther’s as bad as be-fore,
I think we will stay, do not you?”

–Anonymous

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