Winter Squash – Sweet Dumpling

Winter Squash, Sweet Dumpling (C.Pepo)
Winter Squash, Sweet Dumpling (C.Pepo)

Sweet Dumpling is a very sweet, tender orange flesh and a acornish shape with ivory skin with dark green stripes. The Sweet dumpling has pale orange flesh About the perfect size for having and filling with a meat stuffing for a nice two-person meal starter.

Species

Cucurbita

Genus

Pepo

Classification

Squash

Family

Acorn

Days To Maturity

100-110 days

Fruit Size

A small to medium sized squash ranging in diameter from 5 to 7 inches.

Weight

¾ to 1 lb

Skin Color

Ivory skin with dark green stripes

Habit

Medium length vines

Seed Depth

½ – 1″

Seeds Per group

4 -6

Seed Spacing

6″

Space Between Hills

4 – 6′

Day To Germination

7 – 14

Thin To (Plants Per hill)

2

Year Introduced

1976

Heirloom

No

Resistance

Unknown

Usage

Edible – Very good food qualities

Storage

Good Keeper

Space Saver

Can be planted in your landscaping or in a very large pot.  Also, can be grown vertically.

Substitution

substitutes for Acorn or carnival

Related References

How many beans to grow in the Garden?

With the gardening season nearing, it’s time to consider what to plant and how much to plant. When considering how many beans to plant, follow these general rules.

As a rule, when planning for how many beans to plant in a season, you will need:

  • fifty feet of row per person for bush beans, or
  • thirty-five feet of row per person of pole beans.

Many gardeners make a distinction for planting amounts between varieties (e.g. common Vs. lima) or usage (snap Vs. dry), but this is not necessary, the rules hold up.

If you plan to dual-purpose your beans, to use and consume them both as snap and dry beans, then double your row footage per a person.  Additionally, mark which rows will be used as snap or dry beans is recommended to ensure the best possible quality and sufficient quantity for each use.  Keep in mind that snap beans are harvested while young tender and dry beans need time to mature and dry on the vine.

Seed savers should plant an additional ten feet of dry bean row and then select the best dry bean as seeds for next year’s garden and a few extra as reserve seed in case of crop failure.

Related References

Growing Winter Squash and Pumpkins Vertically

Winter Squash Grown Vertically
Winter Squash Grown Vertically

Growing winter squash and pumpkins vertically can save garden space and help to fight pests.  To grow squash vertically, here a few simple tips to follow:

  • Choosing the correct seed is the best place to begin. To grow squash Vertically choose squash that has a vining habit (sometimes called trailing) and produce small fruit; two pounds or less is recommended. Growing squash that can grow to a hundred pounds or more would be hard to accommodate when building the structure to be climbed and would break from the vines before mature.
  • Site and climbing structure should be properly prepared. The climbing structure should be strong enough to withstand strong winds and the weight of the squash as they reach maturity.
  • The soil needs to be well worked and mounded to allow soil based watering methods, such as trench or soaker hose and provides adequate drainage.
  • The grooming method needs to be adapted to encourage the growth of several small fruits. Many gardeners recommend removing fruit and leaving only one or two on each vine; thus, encouraging a few large fruits.  When growing vertically we want to encourage the growth of numerous small fruit, which will be less likely to tear the vines down or fall off the vine.
  • As squash grow larger and providing additional support for the fruit may be desirable to prevent the fruit from tearing themselves from the vine before mature or falling to earth and breaking or being bruised.
  • With some early maturing varieties picking of fruit may be necessary as the fruit becomes fully mature to reduce weight in the vine and to encourage the vine to produce more fruit. Care should be taken to ensure the fruit is fully mature.

Growing Watermelons Vertically

Growing small to medium vining watermelons vertically on a lattice, trellis, or wire fence can save a significant amount of garden space. Growing watermelons vertically also helps with air circulation and increases exposure to sunlight, thus improving the overall plant health. An eight to ten-foot-tall lattice is usually sufficient. I find that reinforced wire latticeworks best if the watermelon plants are spaced similarly to a row. A lower lattice will work fine if enough horizontal space is provided for the vines to run. I must admit that I have used a link fence around my yard as just such a lattice more than once with excellent results. A word of caution, though, if the fruit of your watermelons become too large, you may need to support with a sling. The sling helps hold the additional weight of larger fruit. If you choose a wood lattice or trellis, you may need to gently tie the watermelons vines to the uprights to support them. Once watermelons reach the top of a trellis and begin to run flat, there should be no more need to tie off the vines.

Growing Watermelons vertically can save garden space and help to fight pests., Here are a few simple rules follow to grow watermelons vertically:

  • Choosing the correct seed is the best place to begin. To grow watermelons vertically, choose watermelons, which have a vining habit (sometimes called trailing) and produce small fruit; five pounds (e.g., Golden Midget {Seed Saver Exchange], Snack Pack Hybrid {Burpee}) or less are recommended. Growing large watermelons would be hard to accommodate when building the structure to be climbed and would break from the vines before mature.
  • Site and climbing structure should be properly prepared. The climbing structure should be strong enough to withstand strong winds and the weight of the watermelons as they reach maturity.
  • The soil needs to be well worked and mounded to allow for deep soil watering methods, such as basin, trench, soaker hose, or drip irrigation and provides adequate drainage.
  • The grooming method needs to be adapted to encourage the growth of many small fruits. Many gardeners recommend removing fruit and leaving only one or two on each vine; thus, encouraging a few large fruits. When growing vertically, we want to encourage the growth of numerous small fruit, which will be less likely to damage the vines down or fall off the vine. Pruning the tip of the vines from time to time as it will force the vines to branch and provide more opportunity to grow more fruit and keep the size of each fruit, on average smaller.
  • As watermelons grow larger and providing additional support for the fruit may be necessary to prevent the fruit from ripping themselves from the vine before mature or falling to earth and breaking or being bruised. Providing additional support can be done by providing a sling made of cheesecloth or a piece of old nylon stocking attached to the trellis.

Related References