Common Types Of Microgreens

With the cooler weather of fall upon us, it is time to conder moving our gardening efforts indoors, which make growing microgreens an appealing option.

But what to grow as microgreens?

Considering most garden vegetables and herbs can be grown as Microgreens, the options are many. So, which microgreens to grow for your family depends on what your family eats regularly, and Your family’s taste preferences. 

Most Common Types oF Microgreens

The broad type of microgreens (listed below in family groups)  Should provide the basics of what kind of taste the microgreens will have, and the growing conditions the type of microgreens prefer:

Amaranthaceae family:

  • The Amaranthaceae family includes amaranth, beets, chard, quinoa, and spinach.

Amaryllidaceae family

  • Amaryllidaceae family includes chives, garlic, leeks, and onions.

Apiaceae family

  • The Apiaceae family includes carrot, celery, dill, cilantro, and fennel.

Asteraceae family

  • The Asteraceae family includes chicory, endive, lettuce, and radicchio.

Brassicaceae family

  • The Brassicaceae family includes arugula, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, radish, and watercress.

Cucurbitaceae family

The Cucurbitaceae family includes cucumbers, melons, pumpkins, and squashes.

Lamiaceae family

  • The Lamiaceae family includes the most common herbs like mint, basil, rosemary, sage, and oregano.

Poaceae family

  • The Poaceae family includes grasses and cereals like barley, corn, rice, oats, and wheatgrass.
  • The Poaceae family also includes in legumes, including beans, chickpeas, and lentils.

Related References

How to Freeze a Homemade Pie: A Guide on Freezing Homemade Pies

One of the frequently asked questions is, “Can homemade pies be frozen? Well, the appropriate answer is Yes! Pies made at home can freeze wonderfully. There are several reasons to freeze your pies; for instance, you could be preparing pies in advance for a family dinner, an upcoming holiday, or looking to store some to eat later on. Regardless of the reason, the guide below is a recipe for enthralling freezing results.

we use the same baking method and ingredients most people use at home to roast our pies. Therefore, the steps below can apply for all our pies, and those baked similarly.

Freezing

  • Make and bake your pie in using disposal/recyclable pies pans.
  • After baking the until the pie is completely done, remove the pie from the oven and cool on a rack. Please ensure that the pie cools completely before proceeding.
  • Using an airtight freezer bag or plastic wrap, wrap and seal the cooled pie.
  • Place the wrapped pie in a freezer. To freeze thoroughly may take 24 hours or a little longer to freeze the pie fully.

Cook’s Note:

  • Pies take approximately 8 hours to cool fully. Checking on cool time guidelines is essential for the best results.

Storage Half-Life

When it comes to the storage half-life, you will get different estimates on how long the frozen pies can last. However, from our vast experience, we recommend the following time limits. Note that we have estimated the shortest period. Therefore, you can leave it for quite a little longer without worrying about its safety for consumption.

  • Frozen fruit pies are best served within six months.
  • Custard based pies should be served within three months once frozen.

Defrosting and Serving

If you check various sources, two main methods can be used to defrost and serve frozen homemade pies. Both methods work exceptionally well, but we like one of the methods since it is relatively convenient.

First Defrosting Method

  • Pre-warm the oven to more than 300.
  • Remove the pie from the freezer and unwrap the pie.
  • Remove any accumulated frost common on the top side of the pie.
  • Place the frozen pie in a baking sheet and place it in the preheated oven.

The baking times vary, so verifying doneness is essential. An easy way to check whether or not a pie is ready is to insert a knife to the center, remove and feel the temperature of the knife tip using your finger. If the knife is warm, your pie is ready for consumption. That said, the various baking times include;

  • 5” pie takes between 15 to 30 minutes
  • 7” pie takes between 30 to 50 minutes
  • 10” pie takes between 40 to 70 minutes.

Let the pie cool then serve.

Second Defrosting Method

This method takes much more time compared to the first method.

  • As usual, take out the frozen pie from the freezer and leave it for at least 5 to 6 hours
  • Unlike the first method, don’t remove the plastic wraps or airtight freezer bag. Defrost the pie with the wraps on it for approximately 4 to 5 hours or to room temperature. Doing this allows condensation to occur outside the plastic wrap instead of forming on the pie’s crust.
  • Once condensed, unwrap the pie and put it on a baking sheet.
  • Place the pie to heat in the oven for 30 minutes at 300. Note that the timing applies to all pies regardless of the size.
  • Remove the pie from the oven, place on a rack, and let the pie cool and serve.

Pie Freezing Do’s and Don’ts

Freezing pies can be as simple as the guide outlines above. However, there are some things to note when freezing your pie. Below are common dos and don’ts when freezing a pie.

  • Do label the pies with descriptions and dates of placing them in the freezer.
  • Do store the pies together and with other similar foods in the freezer.
  • Do freeze pies in individual portions, which makes it easy to thaw only what you need and shortens thawing time.
  • Do leave some air between the wrapped pies, which allows air to circulate freely.
  • Don’t freeze the pies while hot. Make sure that they cool before putting them in a freezer.
  • Don’t use extra-large containers.
  • Do squeeze all the extra air from freezer bags used to wrap the pie before sealing.

There you have it. We hope this guide will help you achieve better-frozen homemade pies. Observe the dos and don’ts for better results.

Commonly Used Perennial Culinary Herbs

Perennial herbs are an excellent choice for your garden. Perennial herbs continue to grow and provide fresh herbs for your kitchen for many years if given a little care.

You can prepare a mouthwatering recipe by using Perennial herbs. Perennial herbs are good for your health, and you can also use them to make salads, stews, and soups.

Perennial herbs can be grown at ease, and the best part is that you can harvest them at any time of the year. Some of the most commonly used perennial culinary herbs are:

Mint

Mint is recognized to be one of the well renowned perennial culinary herbs which are used for cooking on an extensive scale. Though it is lemony or bit-peppery in its raw form, mint leaves a cool after taste.

Mints have slightly dented, pointy, oval, and bright green leaves along with the sturdy stem. Mint is used for cooking on an extensively in Middle-Eastern and North African recipes.

This herb emanates a refreshing smell. The intense flavor of this herb makes it the best option to cook fish sauces, peas, lamb, vegetables, and chocolate. You can also use mint to prepare tea and other beverages. The most popular varieties of mint which are used for cooking include spearmint, good old peppermint, and apple mint.

Rosemary

It is another popular favorable herb that can be used for cooking vegetables, meat, and poultry. In addition to this, you can also use it with apricots, garlic, roasted potatoes, and roasted chicken. You are going to love this plant for its delightful scent.

They are used on an extensive scale in different types of floral arrangements. The intense flavor of this herb contributes to being one of the prominent reasons why this herb is used for cooking across the globe. It has needle leaves along with hard woody stems.

Sage

This is another worth mentioning name in the list of perennial culinary herbs, which is used for the preparation of Balkan and Italian dishes. You can fry it with light batter for preparing pork, sausages, and bacon.

You can also make the best use of this herb for preparing fresh stuffed pasta, butter, rabbits, eggs, to name a few. Furthermore, you can use this aromatic herb for making sauces, seasoning meats, and vegetables. Sage in its dried form emits strong flavor.

Dill

This herb has earned a high reputation for its fresh aroma and amazing delicate flavor. The leaves of this plant are soft and light. It is used for the preparation of Eastern and Northern cuisines. Dill is an ideal choice for cucumbers, green soups, salmon, beetroot, cream, pickles, and other recipes. Dill can also be used to season peas, potatoes, lamb, and fish.

Oregano

This perennial herb is primarily grown in the warm climate of Mediterranean and Eurasia. Also referred to as the wild aroma, it is used to flavor a plethora of American and Italian dishes. Oregano is commonly used in the preparation of Turkish, Grek, and Mediterranean dishes. Oregano, also, goes well with olive oil, tomatoes, lamb, pizza, yogurt, and kebabs.

Spring is the ideal season for growing this herb. This delicious herb comes with a lovely smell, and you can use it for different purposes in your kitchen.

Winter Savory

It is recognized to be the perfect herb for the preparation of cold and warm dishes. You can use winter savory to make tasty teas. winter savory is useful in adding an aromatic flavor to a plethora of recipes.

Besides this, it boasts of a bunch of anti-fungal and anti-bacterial properties. The intense flavor of this spicy herb makes it an ideal choice for the preparation of poultry, beans, and fish. You can also use it for garnishing the salad and flavoring the liqueurs.

Lemon Balm

This perennial herb comprises of medicinal properties, and it is regarded as an ideal option for the kitchen. You can use lemon balm to garnish meals. It can also be used for the preparation of teas and other beverages.

Lavender

This perennial herb produces a variety of purple flowers which add to the beauty of the garden. It is used for the preparation of dressings and salad. It offers a bit of sweet flavor to a plethora of dishes.

The dried lavender buds and lavender syrup make it the ideal choice for the preparation of Lavender marshmallows and scones. This herb also consists of different health benefits, which make it the prime choice for cooking.

Thyme

The perennial herb tyme can found in most kitchens. Tyme is known to have a pungent, earthy, and lemony smell. tyme is used widely in Middle Eastern and Mediterranean countries recipes.

Tyme can be used in barbecue meats, eggplants, mushrooms, chicken, roasted vegetables such as tomatoes, bell peppers, zucchini, and goat cheese. You can also add this herb for preparing stews and soups.

Conclusion

The above-mentioned herbs are regarded as the best option for the preparation of different cuisines. They are used primarily after drying, and their flavor and aroma enhance the taste.

The best thing about these perennial herbs is that perennial herbs can easily be grown in pots, in your yard or in your garden. All you need is an adequate amount of water, right exposure to light, and care and you are good to go.

Recipe – Paleo Chicken Soup for Two

This is my daughter’s paleo chicken soup recipe, which makes two servings. I like the pictures when she sent them to us, so, I asked her to do a quick recipe and here it is.

Ingredients for Broth

  • 1 pot of water (about 6 – 8 cups)
  • 1 pound chicken thighs (boneless and skinless)
  • 1 packet Sazon Goya con Azafran
  • 2 chopped zucchinis
  • 1-2 cups chopped carrots
  • 10 small potatoes quartered
  • 2 teaspoons Mead and Marrowbone broth concentrate (burn flavor)
  • 2 cups rice (optional)
  • 2 small onions chopped
  • 3 stalks of celery chopped
  • 2 large pinches of Himalayan sea salt
  • 1/2 tablespoon chopped garlic

Ingredients for Garnish

  • 10 small radishes sliced
  • 1 bunch of cilantro (remove leaves and chop)
  • 2 small onions chopped
  • 3 limes halved
  • Cholula hot sauce

Directions

  • Bring a pot of water to a boil
  • Add in all ingredients for the broth
  • Reduce heat to medium
  • Cook until all vegetables are cooked through and chicken is soft (30-45 min)
  • Remove chicken and shred with knife and fork then add back in
  • Serve in bowl
  • Garnish with limes, onions, cilantro, radishes to taste
  • Add hot sauce, salt, and pepper to taste

Recipe – Cottage Cheese And Apple Pancakes

Recipe – Cottage Cheese And Apple Pancakes
Cottage Cheese And Apple Pancakes

With fall upon us, it is apple season, so here is a quick recipe to use some of those fall apples and have a hearty breakfast.

Recipe Ingredients

  • Dry Cottage cheese – 250 gr
  • Egg- 1 large or jumbo
  • Sugar – 2 tablespoon
  • Vanilla sugar- 1 teaspoon
  • Flour – 1 tablespoon
  • Semolina – 1 tablespoon
  • Apple- 1 small
  • Lemon zest
  • Pinch (1/8 teaspoon) of salt (optional)
  • Lemon juice – 1 teaspoon
  • Breadcrumb- 1 tablespoon
  • Oat bran- 1 tablespoon

Recipe Directions

  • Apple wash and peel.
  • Cut into small cubes.
  • To prevent browning, coat the apples with lemon juice.
  • Mash the cottage with a fork

Note

Use dry cottage cheese. Otherwise, the recipe will need more flour.  If the cottage cheese is wet, then strain the cottage cheese through a cheesecloth.

  • In cottage cheese, add Apple and mix.
  • In cheese with Apple, add egg, sugar, vanilla sugar, a pinch of salt, lemon zest, add cinnamon to taste, and mix thoroughly.
  • Add dry ingredients and mix until smooth.
  • Mix oat bran and breadcrumb.
  • Roll the balls and roll them in the breading. Form cheese pancakes.
  • Fry the cheese pancakes on both sides until golden brown.

Oatmeal Equivalent Measures

Sometimes when working with recipes the ingredients are not always provided in the measure with which we are most familiar.  So, here is a quick reference for converting dry oatmeal to an equivalent measure which you use regularly.

Amount In CupsAmount In Grams (g)Amount In Ounces (oz)
1/8 cup10 g0.4 oz
1/4 cup20 g0.7 oz
1/3 cup25 g0.9 oz
3/8 cup30 g1.1 oz
1/2 cup40 g1.4 oz
5/8 cup50 g1.8 oz
2/3 cup55 g1.9 oz
3/4 cup60 g2.1 oz
7/8 cup70 g2.5 oz
1 cup80 g2.8 oz
2 cups160 g5.6 oz
4 cups320 g11.3 oz

Recipe – Oatmeal With Pumpkin And Cinnamon

I’ve been seeing the usual fall selection of pumpkins and winter squash in the market for a couple of weeksnow, so, I thought it might be nice to put them to some use. Here is a quick and easy way to have some fresh pumpkin or winter squash (Butternut, Hubbard, Tan Cheese…etc.) to use for breakfast.

Ingredients

  • Oatmeal – 50 gr (1.8 ounces or 5/8 cup)
  • Pumpkin – 70 gr (1/2 cup)
  • Milk -250 ml (1 cup)
  • Pinch of cinnamon – 1/8 teaspoon
  • Vanilla sugar -1 teaspoon
  • Honey – 1 tablespoon
  • Butter – 1 tablespoon

Directions

  • In a saucepan combine milk, honey, butter, cinnamon, vanilla sugar, and bring to a simmer on medium-low heat.
  • Grate pumpkin with a coarse grater.
  • When the milk with spices starts to simmer, add the pumpkin, and stir gently.
  • When milk with pumpkin starts to simmer again, add oatmeal, and slow simmer for 10 minutes.
  • Remove from heat, cover, and let the oatmeal to infuse for a few 5 minutes.
  • Serve and enjoy.

Servings

  • Makes one serving