Northern Meteorological Seasons – Everything You Should Know

The classification of the calendar in four groups of three months based on the prevailing temperature conditions is said called Meteorological seasons. This is a more precise way of segmenting the year.

So what are these seasons, and why are these seasons important? In this piece, we will try finding some answers to those questions. According to meteorological studies, all the seasons start on the first day of all months that either includes a solstice or an equinox. Based on the above, the seasons are grouped as:

  • The Spring season starts from March 1st to May 31st.
  • The summer season starts from June 1st to August 31st.
  • The Fall or Autumn starts from September 1st to November 30th.
  • The Winter that runs from December 1st to February 28th or 29th.

Let’s have a closer look at these four seasons.

Spring Season (March 1st to May 31st)

After the dreadful and cold winter season, this is the most sought after time of the year. When the flowers start blooming, and the sun is out with its subtle brightness – this season truly marks the beginning of a beautiful Season. This is the season when the entire landscape comes back to life. The sunlight is strong, and the temperatures begin to rise slightly and the days start to get longer. The weather can change from sunny to dry to wet in a moment during this season. This season is truly the season that catches every romantics’ attention.

In this season, you will find some trees blossoming and many low growing plants full of beautiful flowers. This is the time when all animals that had gone into their winter hibernation come out of their hideouts to enjoy the season. Many other animals and birds return home from their winter venues and start their breeding. Overall the weather is extremely pleasant, and there are glistening greenery and colorful blossoms and flowers all around.

Summer Season (June 1st to August 31st)

After the Spring follows the summers. Summer is the hottest time of the year when temperatures soar and can become uncomfortable. The temperatures may not drop much even after the sun goes down. The sky is clear, the sun is shining bright and hot, and it becomes difficult to stay out in the hot sun for long. This is, however, that time of the year when most of the game seasons are planned and played as the weather is clear. So, it is one of the high octane times of the year.

This is that time of the year when the trees are full of loads of leaves, and every plant is full of flowers. People spend most of their time outdoors enjoying the sunny days outside. You will see tourists flocking to many beach cities to catch some sunlight.

Fall or Autumn Season (September 1st to November 30th)

This is the season when the temperatures start falling again. You will see increased rainfall in some areas. This is the season when the trees start shedding their leaves. Many high altitude animals start growing fur as a preparation for the upcoming winter season, and many gain weight before they can get into a long winter season sleep called hibernation.

In this season, plants become less active and get dormant. This season witnesses some cultural harvest festivals, and in America, Thanksgiving is an important homecoming festival celebrated in this season.

Winter Season (December 1st to February 29th)

Here comes the season of chills. This is the coldest season characterized by short days and long cold nights. Trees lose their leaves and get inactive and dormant during the winter. Many animals enter a state of hibernation and start their deep sleep. Other animals move or migrate to warmer regions. People need to wear thick clothes to keep themselves warm. The winds are freezing and brings ice and snow or even cold rains at times.

This is that phase and time of the year when every creature – animal, plants, life takes a backseat. The landscape and the scenery go in a state of slumber, and many places get covered with snow or ice.

Conclusion

Knowing about these seasons is extremely important for many aspects of human lives. Knowing about the weather and its patterns beforehand helps in planning crops and their harvesting, horticulture, and garden planning, and to stay prepared for storms and bad weather or any eventualities.

So now that you are aware of these four weather seasons, you will now be able to plan things better based on the season. So next time when you plan a holiday or want to go to watch a game, you would know when to plan one.

Shortcut Key Lime Pie

Looking for an easy desire to put on the table which doesn’t require much stovetop or cooktop time? Well, here you go.  In fact, if you heat the water in the microwave, you needn’t touch the stove or oven.   This recipe is handy year-round, but especially so in the warm weather of summer.

Total Time

  • 2 hours, 20 minutes

Preparation Time

  • Twenty minutes

Refrigeration Time

  • Two Hours

Ingredients

  • 1 carton (8 ounces) fat-free whipped topping
  • 1 purchased or prepared graham cracker crust
  • 1/4 cup boiling water
  • 2 cartons (6 ounces each) Key lime yogurt
  • 1 package (0.3 ounces) sugar-free lime gelatin

Directions

  • In a large bowl, combine the gelatin and boiling water to gelatin.
  • Stir gelatin about two minutes until gelatin is completely dissolved.
  •  Whisk in yogurt.
  • Gently fold in whipped topping.
  • Pour into crust.
  • Level and smooth out filling.
  • Refrigerate, covered, until set, about 2 hours.
  • Garnish, if desire
  • Cut and serve cold.

Servings

  • This recipe makes eight servings

Recipe – Lemon Icebox Pie

This recipe is a taste summertime recipe and makes a nice addition to any meal meals. This recipe has the benefits of:

  • This Lemon Icebox Pie uses no gelatin
  • This Lemon Icebox Pie uses no Cool Whip
  • No baking required.

Ingredients

  • ½ to ¾ cup of lemon juice, according to taste
  • 1 ½ cups granulated sugar, Splenda, or your favorite powdered sweetener equivalent
  • 1 ½ teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1 can (12 ounces) condensed milk
  • 1 tablespoon melted butter (if using a prepared graham cracker crust)
  • 8 ounces cream cheese, softened and cubed
  • 9 inch, prepared, graham cracker crust or blind-baked pie crust (fully cooked)

Directions

  • Put softened cream cheese cubes in a large bowl and beat until soft and has no large lumps.
  • Add milk and sweetener and beat until thoroughly combined.
  • Add vanilla and lemon juice, then beat until light and fluffy.
  • If using a prepared graham cracker crust, with a small cooking brush, coat the prepared graham cracker crust with melted butter to soften it.
  • Gently, Pour Lemon filling mixture into prepared pie crust.
  • Refrigerate the Lemon pie 4 hours or more before slicing.
  • Plate the sliced Lemon pie, garnish with whip cream, if desired, and serve.

Serving

  • Makes about 6-8 servings

How to Freeze Green Beans at Home

Do you want to know how to freeze green beans? Are you looking for the best storage option to use green beans throughout the year? Green beans are healthy and can help you to boost your digestion. However, fresh green beans are not available in all seasons. But you can store them in your freezer and use whenever you want.

Storage is easy, and you can store frozen green beans for almost a year. You might be thinking about how. Here are a few tips that can help you to store green beans in your freezer. You will have to take care of every detail, such as to pick the beans at the right time as well as following the right storage method.

How to Choose the Best Green Bean for Freezing?

For the storage, you will have to be a little choosy while picking green beans. Picking is important since if you choose wrong beans or at the wrong time, then you might not store them for long. Also, beans might lose the freshness and flavor if not chosen properly. The peak season to store green beans is from May to October. You can choose any day between these months to ensure the best outcome. In the peak seasons, yummy and fresh green beans will be available in your local store. Visit your local store and choose blemish-free, crisp, and bright-colored beans. Take extra caution to avoid the green beans with shivered ends or limp.

Make sure that these beans do not have small beans inside. Though the small beans do not affect the quality and taste of the green beans, still, these are not considered good for the storage. The size signifies that the bean is past its prime.

You will have to choose the freshest possible bean and freeze soon after picking them from the store or your garden. It is suggested to freeze on the same day. If you want to wait for some obvious reason like a busy schedule, then keep them in the freeze in the meantime.

Prep Your Freezing Containers

Your freezing container does not need much preparation. You can use jars, bags, and a freezer container to store green beans. All you need is to clean those containers and then make it completely dry. Any moisture is not suggested since it can damage the beans. After keeping green beans in the container or bag, you can simply shake them to compact beans.

How to Prep the Green Bean for Freezing

Now you have the fresh green beans and freeze containers. The next is how to prepare the beans for storage. You can consider any with or without blanching. We will discuss both the methods. To start with, use cool tap water to wash green beans. After washing, take a small handful of green beans and line up their stem ends and use a sharp chef’s knife to cut the stems. Repeat the process with the remaining beans. If required, you can trim off its tapered tail ends. As a lot of recipes need cut green beans, you can cut your beans into one-inch pieces for easy storage. If you want, you can store whole green beans depending on your preference. Both ways will offer the same benefit.

Wash your beans with water again to get rid of any dirt and then dry beans completely. Proper drying up is important to ensure better storage. You can use a paper or cloth towel to dry green beans completely. The drying up process will not take more than half an hour.

Now pack the beans into the jars, bags, or container. Seal the container following the manufacturer instructions and press hard to get rid of all the possible air. You can also use a freezer tape around the container lid edges to get a tight seal.

The above method will enable you to freeze green beans with blanching. Some suggested blanching for more effective storage. Blanching will demand one more step. You will have to boil beans in water for a few minutes and then dunk them in ice water. It will help green beans to maintain the flavor and color during freezing.

For boiling, get water in a large pot and boil them. Place beans into the boiling water for two to four minutes depending on the size of beans. While using large beans, you can boil for four minutes and small beans, the time should not exceed two minutes. Soon after, you will have to cool the beans quickly in rice water. Once the beans are cooled down, drain them and follow the same process for the storage. Pack the drained green beans into containers, bags, or jars. Shake the container to compact green beans and add more beans while leaving 1-2 inch headspace.

Package and Label Your Green Bean

After packing the beans in the container by following the above instructions, the next step is to label those containers. You will have to label each container with the content name, packaging date, and amount. It is important to mention all the details in the labeling. Otherwise, you might forget the packaging date and might not use them at the right time.

How to Freeze Your Green Beans

If you are using bags, then rearrange your bags in such a way that you can lay them as flat as possible. This will ensure quick freezing and will preserve the original flavor and taste of your beans as well. Lay the containers or bag flat to the freezer in the batches. Besides, leave some space near the container so that air can easily circulate. Now, your beans are safe in the freezer. You can use them whenever you want for cooking.

How Long Can Frozen Green Beans Be Stored?

As stated earlier, frozen green beans can be stored for a long time up to a year if you follow the right freezing method or choose the right green beans. You can store frozen beans around nine months while using a conventional freezer. If you want to store even longer, then you can use a deep freeze appliance.

What is a Soda float?

What is an ice cream soda float?

Soda float or Ice cream soda float is a dessert-type or recreational-type drink made using ice cream and soda, carbonated water or soft drink such as root beer (hence the alternative name; root beer float). The drink may contain other ingredients such as candy, syrup, milk, and whipped cream.

Ice cream soda originates from the US. It was first created by Robert McCay Green, a flavored drink seller back in 1874 in Philadelphia, PA. The idea came to him on a hot day after he ran out of the ice he was using to make flavored drinks and decided to use vanilla ice cream instead. It’s worth noting there are other people who claim to have invented the ice cream float, including Green’s own employee, George Guy, Fred Sanders, and Philip Mohr.

Besides having a great taste, ice cream soda works because the carbon dioxide inside the soda is displaced from the resulting solution to form a small fountain of foam and bubbles that isn’t messy.

What are the most common flavors of ice cream soda floats?

There are many flavors based mainly on the ingredients. The most common include vanilla, chocolate, strawberry, coke, root beer;

1. Vanilla ice cream soda float

This drink is made using several scoops of vanilla ice cream and unflavored carbonated water. The ice cream is put first in a glass before pouring in carbonated water until the resulting foam rises to the top. Some whipped cream is added and a cherry.

When Sprite soda or 7 Up is used instead of unflavored carbonated water, the resulting drink is known as snow white. 

2. Chocolate ice cream soda float

This drink is made like the vanilla ice cream soda float. The only difference is the ingredients used, i.e., chocolate ice cream or vanilla ice cream with chocolate syrup.

3. Strawberry ice cream soda float

This drink is made in a similar manner to vanilla float ice cream soda float but using strawberry flavored ingredients like strawberry soda, strawberry syrup, and strawberry or vanilla ice cream.

4. Coke ice cream float

As the name suggests, this ice cream float is made with any cola/coke drink and vanilla ice cream.

5. Root beer float

Root beer float or brown cow or black cow is made using root beer and vanilla ice cream. However, some variations use other ice cream flavors. Beer may also be substituted, making variations like black cow different in some region in the US. While root beer float contains only root beer and vanilla ice cream in some places, some areas use chocolate ice cream to make a brown cow or chocolate cow. Some areas also substitute beer with cola and call it a black cow such as Northern Illinois and Northeastern Wisconsin.

Southern Style Icebox Strawberry Pie

With the hot weather of summer and early fall and icebox pie is always a nice way to put dessert.  When strawberries are in bountiful, this strawberry icebox pie is an easy way to put some fruit on the table, which will be appreciated by all.

Cook’s Note

  • You need to finish with two cups of filling.
  • Making your own whipped cream and pie crust at home is an excellent way to add variety to this pie.
  • However, in a pinch for time or simply for convenience, store-bought whipped cream and pie crust work just fine.
  • This recipe uses a 0.60-ounce package sugar-free strawberry flavored gelatin, which makes it a little firmer.  However, a 0.30-ounce package can be used, and regular sweetened gelatin works equally well.

Icebox Strawberry Pie Filling Ingredients

  • 1 (0.6-ounce) package sugar-free strawberry flavored gelatin
  • 1 (9-inch) pie shell, blind-baked and cooled
  • 1-1/2 cups cold water
  • 2 pints fresh strawberries, hulled and diced
  • 2 tablespoons cornstarch
  • 3 tablespoons sugar (optional)

Icebox Strawberry Pie Filling Directions

  • Blind-bake pie crust and cool.
  • Wash, hull and dice strawberries and set aside.
  • In a small bowl, mix gelatin in 1/2 cups cold water and allow to bloom
  •  In a large saucepan, combine 1 cup water and cornstarch until smooth.
  • Bring mixture to a boil stirring constantly on medium; continue cooking and stirring for 2 minutes or until thickened.
  • Remove mixture from the heat; stir in bloomed gelatin and sugar (if desired) until dissolved.
  • Transfer to a bowl and cool to room temperature, about 30 minutes.
  • Stir in diced strawberries.
  • Pour strawberry pie filling into blind-baked crust and level filling.
  • Put the filled pie in refrigerate and chill for 2 hours or until gelatin has set.
  • Slice pie and garnish each serving with whipped topping and, perhaps, a fresh strawberry half.

Related References

The dark green nymph was the fly of the day

Heading out to the lake early in the day and hiking in before the heat set in to do a little flyfishing, the dark green nymph was the fly of the day. While I did catch a few panfish on a dark green woolly worm, the action wasn’t nearly as active, nor the strikes as hard, as it was in the dark green nymph. I tried a variety of other things, but the fish didn’t seem interested in much of anything else.

As I travel along the banks were, and waited in and out of the water, I tried to take some pictures of some of the critters I saw on the shore to get some ideas as to what might or might not work. Here are a few photos of the animals and insects I found onshore that had the potential to be fish food and give some inspiration as to what the fish might be eating in the local area.

As a matter of fact, the dark green nymph was so popular that I managed to catch a catfish on a very aggressive strike, which doesn’t happen to me very often. The fact that I was catching fish that one would not normally expect to catch on the fly, tends to indicate that I was using the right type of fly and that they were plentiful enough to attract other varieties of fish to feed.