Celery Alternatives You Can Grow In Your Garden

Celery in the Home Garden

Most home gardeners don’t bother to grow celery and there is good reason for that.  Celery is a, Biennial grown as an annual, long-season crop, which originates from wetlands and, therefore, requires cool, rich, damp soils to grow is finicky and difficult to grow.

Considering this, a small list of alternative which can be grown in the garden with generally less difficulty may be useful. Especially, if you don’t want to completely depend on the grocer.  Here are few alternatives to true celery, which can be used as celery replacement with some accommodation for your families’ tastes and the dish in which they are used.

Angelica (Anglica archangellica)
Angelica (Anglica archangellica)
Angelica (Anglica archangellica)

Angelica (Anglica archangellica) (Hardiness Zone 4 through 9)

Angelica is a biennial (6 to 8 ft tall) plant, whose the second-year stems can be used like celery.  The stems are slightly sweet and can be used as a side dish or in soups and stews.

Cardoon (Cynara cardunculus)
Cardoon (Cynara cardunculus)
Cardoon (Cynara cardunculus)

Cardoon (Cynara cardunculus) (Hardiness Zone 5 through 9)

Cardoon is a perennial (4 to 6 ft tall) plant, whose young chopped leaf stocks may be used like celery in soups, and stews.

Fennel (F. vulgare dulce)
Fennel (F. vulgare dulce)
Fennel

Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) (Hardiness Zone 5 through 9)

Common Fennel is a perennial (3 to 5 ft tall) plant, whose young stems may be used like celery.  The Florence Fennel bulb is, also, popular as a vegetable for salads and soups.

Lovage (Levisticum officinale)
Lovage (Levisticum officinale)
Lovage (Levisticum officinale)

Lovage (Levisticum officinale) (Hardiness Zone 3 through 8)

Lovage is a perennial (3 to 9 ft tall) plant, which vaguely resembles its cousin celery in appearance and in flavor.  Lovage is much easier to grow than celery and is every bit as tasty.

Rhubarb (Rheum rhabarbarum)
Rhubarb (Rheum rhabarbarum)
Rhubarb (Rheum rhabarbarum)

Rhubarb (Rheum rhabarbarum) (Hardiness Zone 3 through 8)

Now, Rhubarb (sometimes called the” pie plant”) may not be an obvious choice, the the stocks early in the season, with their tart character, can make an excellent replacement for Celery in strongly sauced dishes.  Especially, dishes, which use a sauce with a sweet undertone or which are after the contrasting flavors of sweet and tart.

Related References

What Are Perennial Foods?

Perennial Food, Perennial Food Gardening, edible landscapes
Perennial Food Gardening

Perennial foods, on the whole, are low maintenance sources of food once they’ve been established and their production can be improved with a little tender loving care. Many perennials will be in our backyard trees and/or are landscaping. Their form can be very ranging from bulbs, to berries, it’s to trees and bushes.  When thinking of perennial foods, we must keep an open mind. Many edible foods are ignored by commercial markets, even though, many if not all were eaten by media and/or ancient peoples throughout history.

Please keep in mind that what is a perennial in your area is dictated by your area USDA Plant Hardiness Zone and the hardiness range of the plant itself.

Here is a starter list, which I will update as I have more time.

  • Alliums

    • Bunching onions
    • Chinese leeks
    • Chives
    • Elephant Garlic
    • Egyptian Walking Onions
    • Common Garlic
    • Garlic Chives
    • Potato Onions
    • Shallot

    Berries

    • Cranberry
    • Grapes
    • Blackberry
    • Blueberry
    • Elderberry
    • Gooseberry
    • Huckleberry
    • Musk Strawberry
    • Raspberry
    • Salmonberry
    • Strawberry
    • Turkscap

     

    Bushes & Shrub

    • Autumn Olive
    • Blueberry
    • Cherry
    • Gooseberries
    • Lingonberry
    • Nanking Cherry
    • Sea Buckthorns

    Cactus

    • Prickly Pear Cactus

    Cereals

    • Perennial Buckwheat
    • Pearl Millet
    • Indian Ricegrass

    Herbs

    • Angelica
    • Anise Hyssop
    • Balm (Lemon Balm)
    • Basil (Holy Basil, African Blue)
    • Bunching onions
    • Burnet
    • Chicory
    • Common Oregano ( aka wild marjoram)
    • Egyptian Walking Onions
    • French Tarragon
    • Ginger
    • Horseradish
    • Lavender
    • Lovage
    • Marsh Mello
    • Mexican Oregano
    • Mint
    • Parsley
    • Rosemary
    • Sage
    • Sorrel
    • Tarragon
    • Thyme
    • Winter Savory
    • Yarrow

    Edible Flowers

    • Bee Balm
    • Elderberry Flower
    • Hibiscus
    • Mint
    • Purple Coneflower
    • Rose Hips and Flowers
    • Saffron Crocus
    • Turkscap

    Fruit Trees

    • Apricot
    • Apple
    • Mulberry
    • Cherry
    • Fig
    • Loquat
    • Nectarine
    • Pawpaw
    • Peach
    • Pear (Asian)
    • Pear (European)
    • Persimmon
    • Plum
    • Pomegranate
    • Quince
    • Sour Cherry

    Grasses

    • Bamboo
    • lemongrass

    Legumes

    • Kudzu Bean
    • Winged Bean
    • Honey locust Tree
    • Mesquite Tree
    • Pigeon Pea
    • Scarlet Runner

    Nut Trees

    • Almond
    • Black Walnut
    • English Walnut
    • Hazelnut
    • Pecan

    Vegetables and Greens

    • Angelica
    • Artichoke
    • Asparagus
    • Cardoon
    • Fennel
    • Rhubarb
    • Seakale

    Vines

    • Chayote (Squash)
    • Common Grape (European)
    • Fox Grape
    • Muscadine Grape

Many perennial Forage Foods sources are available, also.

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