How to Oven Roasted-Asparagus

Though you can cook asparagus in different ways but roasting them is considered as the most admired way to cook them. If you do not know how to oven-roasted asparagus, then you should read this write-up till the end as it will also introduce you to the mistakes commonly committed by people while cooking this vegetable.

Some Basic Things to Follow

Before proceeding towards the recipe for roasting asparagus you should know about some basic things like the ends of asparagus spears are normally impossible to cook as they are too hard to cook. So you should trim them before starting to cook them. Before oven roasting asparagus, you should season them generously with pepper and salt. Asparagus should be cooked in an oven in a single layer as they will not char if they have crowded your pan.

Recipe of Oven Roasted Asparagus

Roasted Asparagus Ingredients

Ingredients required to oven-roasted asparagus may include:

  • Trimmed stalks of asparagus (2 pounds)
  • Extra virgin olive oil (3 tbsp)
  • Black pepper
  • salt

Directions for Oven Roast Asparagus

Before starting to roast asparagus in the oven, you should preheat the oven up to 400 degrees. Now put a large baking sheet on a large baking sheet in the oven and place generously seasoned asparagus with olive oil on that sheet. Roast the asparagus sticks up to 25 minutes or until they tender.

Some of the Common Mistakes to Be Avoided

While roasting asparagus, people usually make some common mistakes, which can be avoided while roasting them a bit carefully. Some of these mistakes may include:

Use Of Too Big Or Too Small Asparagus Stalks

While roasting asparagus stalks, you should take them of the right size as too thin stalks can be overcooked easily, whereas thick stalks will be more fibrous and woodier. So, they should be medium in size when you are oven roasting them.

Peeling Asparagus Stalks

According to cooking experts, peeling asparagus before cooking is not necessary. Moreover, it will take much time to peel them. Instead of peeling the asparagus stalks, you should cut off their bottom part as the rest of them is edible.

Cut off Too Much Woody Portion

Some people bend the asparagus stalks to remove their woody portion, which is not the right method to remove their inedible part. According to experts, it is a time-consuming method. You should check them by pressing them with your fingers. The stalk will break up automatically, or you can slice it from that point to remove its woody part easily.

Avoiding Blanching of Asparagus

Most cooking experts blanch asparagus, regardless of the method they use for cooking them. It makes easier to start their cooking process. When you are roasting asparagus without blanching it them its outer surface will be charred, whereas from inside, it will remain raw. You should blanch asparagus in boiling highly salted water for 1-3 minutes, according to the size of its pieces. But you should not blanch it for a longer time as it will boil them, which may not be suitable for roasting them.

By avoiding these mistakes, you can easily oven roast perfect asparagus.

Tips for Cooking Asparagus

Here are a few tips for cooking asparagus.

Roasting Asparagus:

  • For beautifully browned, crisp roasted asparagus, arrange the spears in a single layer with plenty of space on the baking sheet. When the baking sheet is overcrowded, the vegetables will steam rather than roast.

Grilling Asparagus:

  • When grilling Asparagus, skewer to prevent the Asparagus from falling through the grill grates and flipping the Asparagus easier.

Steaming Asparagus In The Microwave:

  • Wrap the asparagus in several damp paper towels before cooking. The paper towels will provide just enough moisture to make the Asparagus tender.

Blanching Asparagus:

  • Have an ice bath ready to rapidly cool the Asparagus as soon as it comes off the stove. Rapidly cooling the Asparagus stops the cooking process immediately and ensures vegetables aren’t overcooked.

Eating Asparagus Raw:

  • If you love the bright, green taste of raw asparagus, ribbons are probably the most playful way to enjoy it. Start with medium-to-large-sized stalks and, using a vegetable peeler to make ribbons. It’s best to hold the asparagus from the bottom and cut down and away from you.

Almost Homemade – Cream of Asparagus Soup

Almost Homemade Asparagus Soup recipe
Almost Homemade Asparagus Soup

This is a quick, easy, way to make a cream of asparagus soup taste and feel more home.  Great for those weeknights when you need something on the table quick, which is both tasty and nutritious.  This approach has the advantage of being super easy.  While I have made this soup from my pantry stocks, if you happen to have an equivalent amount of fresh or frozen, steamed, asparagus available, it works just as well.  This soup makes an excellent meal starter or a nice side dish.

Ingredients

  • 1 packet (approximately 2 ounces) of your favorite cream of asparagus soup mix
  • 1, 15 ounce can of asparagus or about 2 cups of fresh steamed asparagus
  • 15 ounces of milk. (Note: I use whole milk for the nutrition)
  • 15 ounces of your favorite chicken broth (Note: I use unsalted because most soup mixes already contain a lot of salt)

Directions

  • Open and drain canned asparagus — keep can ( I use the can as a measuring cup to save on dishes to wash)
  • Put asparagus in the blender
  • Fill asparagus can with milk and add to blender
  • Fill asparagus can with chicken broth and add to blender
  • Add asparagus soup mix to blender
  • Pulse blend, until contents are moderately smooth and no large chunks remain
  • Pour into a saucepan (Note: I use a 2.5-quart saucepan)
  • Heat on low to medium-low, until hot. Let simmer for about 5 minutes; no strong boiling required.
  • Serve hot.

Related Reference

Asparagus a great perennial garden crop

Asparagus ( Asparagus aficinalis L.), Perennial, #perennial, Perennial Gardening,
Asparagus

Asparagus (Asparagus aficinalis L.) is one of the great perennial garden crops. Originally, from Western Europe, Eastern Asia and throughout Africa this crop is favored by many. If properly planted and cared for, asparagus can last 25 to 30 years and garden.  So, well care for Asparagus beds can be a lifetime investment with a high-value return. Asparagus has been part of the human diet at least since ancient Greek times which is where the word comes from. The American colonists brought asparagus over with them when they landed and it has been a consistent part of the American diet ever since.

Asparagus is prized by many

Asparagus is prized by many and can be found in nearly any grocery section at your local department store sometimes but very interesting prices. With just a little bit of work, and the asparagus bed can provide for your families table 4 years. So, if you’re looking for a high-value low maintenance long-lasting perennial vegetable to put in your vegetable garden asparagus is one of your friends.

Planting Asparagus

General Guidance For Planting Asparagus

Despite the often touted guidance of deep digging to plant asparagus, asparagus likes to grow approximately 4 inches below the soil surface. So normal cultivation to create your asparagus bed will work just fine. However, when you start your bed, you should mark your bed boundaries and place it in a location that you can live with for the next couple of decades. As far as soil preparation goes, the soil should be well cultivated have plenty of humus and rich manure and compost. It helps some if the soil has a slightly sandy character is not overly compact. As usual, I recommend drip irrigation and plenty of good well-aged garden mulch. The site of your asparagus bed should be a well-drained and sunny location.

Starting From Asparagus Seed

If planting seed, start transplants about 80 days before last spring frost. Sow 1/4 to 1/2 inch deep in a sterile growing medium, water and keep temperature 65 to 80 degrees. Germination can take up to 21 days. Transplant to a well prepared, fertilized bed after danger of frost, deeply dug with lots of organic matter. Set plants 12 inches apart in a 6 inches trench, 2 inches deep. Fill in the trench as asparagus grows. Begin harvest in 3 to 4 years.

Starting From Asparagus Root

If Planting Roots. Planting roots reduce harvest by at least 1 to 2 years. Plant roots shortly after receiving them in a well prepared, deeply cultivated, fertilized, garden bed with plenty of organic matter. Asparagus Prefers light, loose soil. Set roots in trenched rows 12 inches apart, in rows 3 to 5 feet apart. The trench should be 4 inches deep. Cover roots with 2 inches of soil. Backfill the trench as asparagus grows. Keep moist. Fertilize again next spring. Begin harvesting in 2 to 3 years.

When to Plant Asparagus

Asparagus roots can be planted in the spring as soon as the soil can be worked in your area.  Dig a trench 4 to 5 inches deep and space the plants 18 to 24 inches apart in the row. Then cover with a good mix of your local soil, compost, and manure. If you go easy on it, a little bit of slow release fertilizer won’t hurt.  If more than one row is planted, space the rows 4 to 5 feet apart. This wide spacing is necessary because of the vigor of the fern growth during the first season and promotes rapid drying of the fern in the fall to prevent disease problems.

How much Asparagus to Plant

You will need 8 to 10 plants per person.

Care and Maintenance of Asparagus

Asparagus requires little care once it is established. The biggest problem faced by gardeners is weed control. A weed control program should be started early. Weeds can be kept under control by carefully hoeing, cultivating, or using a rototiller. Cultivation deeper than 2 or 3 inches can damage the roots.  Also, the use of a nice deep layer of mulch between rows can aid significantly with the reduction of weeds in your asparagus patch.  In the spring when the spears begin to appear, a nice fresh layer of compost mix with a slow release balanced fertilizer is very beneficial. Also after applying the fertilizer, a new layer of protective garden mulch should be applied. Stop harvesting when about 3/4 of the spears are about the diameter of a pencil. These should be left to replenish the food supplies to the roots.  Because the tops of asparagus plants produce and transfer food to the roots, they should be allowed to grow all summer. The tops can be removed when they die after a killing frost in the fall.

Harvesting Asparagus

During the first year after planting, you should be able to harvest several times,  depending on temperatures. There is no need to wait until two years after planting before you harvest. In fact, harvesting the first year after planting will stimulate more buds to be produced on the crown which means greater yields in later years. Spears can be harvested for a period of 2 to 3 weeks the first year. In succeeding years, the length of harvest increases to about 4 to 6 weeks, or for as long as the spears are large.

Select spears that are 6 to 8 inches tall with light tips. As the tips begin to loosen, known as “ferning out”, the base of the spears will begin to get tough. Stop harvesting when about 3/4 of the spears are about the diameter of a pencil. These should be left to replenish the food supplies to the roots.

Asparagus is harvested by cutting them off with a sharp, well sanitized, knife just below the ground. Care should be taken not to damage other nearby spears just below the surface. Asparagus should be used as soon as it is harvested, but it will remain fairly fresh for up to a week if kept at 35 degrees to 38 degrees Fahrenheit with the cut ends in water.

What Are Perennial Foods?

Perennial Food, Perennial Food Gardening, edible landscapes
Perennial Food Gardening

Perennial foods, on the whole, are low maintenance sources of food once they’ve been established and their production can be improved with a little tender loving care. Many perennials will be in our backyard trees and/or are landscaping. Their form can be very ranging from bulbs, to berries, it’s to trees and bushes.  When thinking of perennial foods, we must keep an open mind. Many edible foods are ignored by commercial markets, even though, many if not all were eaten by media and/or ancient peoples throughout history.

Please keep in mind that what is a perennial in your area is dictated by your area USDA Plant Hardiness Zone and the hardiness range of the plant itself.

Here is a starter list, which I will update as I have more time.

  • Alliums

    • Bunching onions
    • Chinese leeks
    • Chives
    • Elephant Garlic
    • Egyptian Walking Onions
    • Common Garlic
    • Garlic Chives
    • Potato Onions
    • Shallot

    Berries

    • Cranberry
    • Grapes
    • Blackberry
    • Blueberry
    • Elderberry
    • Gooseberry
    • Huckleberry
    • Musk Strawberry
    • Raspberry
    • Salmonberry
    • Strawberry
    • Turkscap

     

    Bushes & Shrub

    • Autumn Olive
    • Blueberry
    • Cherry
    • Gooseberries
    • Lingonberry
    • Nanking Cherry
    • Sea Buckthorns

    Cactus

    • Prickly Pear Cactus

    Cereals

    • Perennial Buckwheat
    • Pearl Millet
    • Indian Ricegrass

    Herbs

    • Angelica
    • Anise Hyssop
    • Balm (Lemon Balm)
    • Basil (Holy Basil, African Blue)
    • Bunching onions
    • Burnet
    • Chicory
    • Common Oregano ( aka wild marjoram)
    • Egyptian Walking Onions
    • French Tarragon
    • Ginger
    • Horseradish
    • Lavender
    • Lovage
    • Marsh Mello
    • Mexican Oregano
    • Mint
    • Parsley
    • Rosemary
    • Sage
    • Sorrel
    • Tarragon
    • Thyme
    • Winter Savory
    • Yarrow

    Edible Flowers

    • Bee Balm
    • Elderberry Flower
    • Hibiscus
    • Mint
    • Purple Coneflower
    • Rose Hips and Flowers
    • Saffron Crocus
    • Turkscap

    Fruit Trees

    • Apricot
    • Apple
    • Mulberry
    • Cherry
    • Fig
    • Loquat
    • Nectarine
    • Pawpaw
    • Peach
    • Pear (Asian)
    • Pear (European)
    • Persimmon
    • Plum
    • Pomegranate
    • Quince
    • Sour Cherry

    Grasses

    • Bamboo
    • lemongrass

    Legumes

    • Kudzu Bean
    • Winged Bean
    • Honey locust Tree
    • Mesquite Tree
    • Pigeon Pea
    • Scarlet Runner

    Nut Trees

    • Almond
    • Black Walnut
    • English Walnut
    • Hazelnut
    • Pecan

    Vegetables and Greens

    • Angelica
    • Artichoke
    • Asparagus
    • Cardoon
    • Fennel
    • Rhubarb
    • Seakale

    Vines

    • Chayote (Squash)
    • Common Grape (European)
    • Fox Grape
    • Muscadine Grape

Many perennial Forage Foods sources are available, also.

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