Almost Homemade – Cream of Celery Soup

This almost home soup is one, which I have prepared from time to time over the years. This approach is a quick and easy way to dress up an ordinary can of cream of celery soup.

Cooking Process

  • In a tablespoon of butter or your favorite cooking oil saute onion and celery (see measures below), over medium heat, until they are tender and the onions are translucent :
    • 1/4 to 1/2 cup of diced sweet onion or shallots, according to taste
    • 4 to 6, diced, celery sticks
  • Add condensed cream of celery soup
  • Replace can of water to be added to whole milk
  • To increase the volume of soup, I usually, add a second can of milk (Optional)
  • Add 1 teaspoon of whole celery seeds  (optional)
  • Simmer until ingredients have combined, then either serve or refrigerate for later use.

Notes

  • We frequently prepare this on Sunday and reheat it in the microwave during the week as a quick and easy dinner starter.

 

Celery Alternatives You Can Grow In Your Garden

Celery in the Home Garden

Most home gardeners don’t bother to grow celery and there is good reason for that.  Celery is a, Biennial grown as an annual, long-season crop, which originates from wetlands and, therefore, requires cool, rich, damp soils to grow is finicky and difficult to grow.

Considering this, a small list of alternative which can be grown in the garden with generally less difficulty may be useful. Especially, if you don’t want to completely depend on the grocer.  Here are few alternatives to true celery, which can be used as celery replacement with some accommodation for your families’ tastes and the dish in which they are used.

Angelica (Anglica archangellica)
Angelica (Anglica archangellica)

Angelica (Anglica archangellica)

Angelica (Anglica archangellica) (Hardiness Zone 4 through 9)

Angelica is a biennial (6 to 8 ft tall) plant, whose the second-year stems can be used like celery.  The stems are slightly sweet and can be used as a side dish or in soups and stews.

Cardoon (Cynara cardunculus)
Cardoon (Cynara cardunculus)

Cardoon (Cynara cardunculus)

Cardoon (Cynara cardunculus) (Hardiness Zone 5 through 9)

Cardoon is a perennial (4 to 6 ft tall) plant, whose young chopped leaf stocks may be used like celery in soups, and stews.

Fennel (F. vulgare dulce)
Fennel (F. vulgare dulce)

Fennel

Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) (Hardiness Zone 5 through 9)

Common Fennel is a perennial (3 to 5 ft tall) plant, whose young stems may be used like celery.  The Florence Fennel bulb is, also, popular as a vegetable for salads and soups.

Lovage (Levisticum officinale)
Lovage (Levisticum officinale)

Lovage (Levisticum officinale)

Lovage (Levisticum officinale) (Hardiness Zone 3 through 8)

Lovage is a perennial (3 to 9 ft tall) plant, which vaguely resembles its cousin celery in appearance and in flavor.  Lovage is much easier to grow than celery and is every bit as tasty.

Rhubarb (Rheum rhabarbarum)
Rhubarb (Rheum rhabarbarum)

Rhubarb (Rheum rhabarbarum)

Rhubarb (Rheum rhabarbarum) (Hardiness Zone 3 through 8)

Now, Rhubarb (sometimes called the” pie plant”) may not be an obvious choice, the the stocks early in the season, with their tart character, can make an excellent replacement for Celery in strongly sauced dishes.  Especially, dishes, which use a sauce with a sweet undertone or which are after the contrasting flavors of sweet and tart.

Related References