Benefits Of Having Birdbaths In Your Yard

Birdbaths are not only meant to create attractive focal points, but also attract a plethora of woodland creatures like birds, butterflies, and insects that are beneficial to your backyard. 

This is undoubtedly the easiest and efficient way to entice wildlife to your garden when compared to building birdhouses or planting beautiful flowers. 

Not convinced yet? Among the benefits of adding a few birdbaths to your backyard garden and landscape.

Benefits Of Adding Birdbaths

1. Provide birds with a source of water

Birds need water for drinking and bathing, especially during the winter season when the natural water supplies have been subjected to freezing points, and there’s limited access to running water. You can help the birds with heated birdbaths, as this type prevents water from freezing.

2.Attracts Other Wildlife

If you are an animal lover, then birdbaths will be your friend because birdbaths will attract other animals such as squirrels and frogs who may be in need of a drink during the summer heat or if you keep your birdbath free of ice in the winter even in the cooler months.

Over the past couple years I have made a couple bird friends, who when I’m cultivating my garden or I’m running with my shovel, will come running and wait nearby on another garden bed or on the fence to swoop in and scarf up any little grubs, bugs, or worms which I might uncover while cultivating my garden beds, which also helps to reduce pests in the garden with the added benefit of some entertainment while you’re working on it.

3. Improve aeration and control pests 

Birdbaths attract different types of birds that feed on various pests, such as slugs, caterpillars, and grasshoppers — which threaten the fruits and vegetables in your garden. This means fewer destructive insects and, of course, less pesticide application. 

Besides the pest control benefit, birds also play an essential role in boosting soil aeration, alleviating compaction through digging the garden in search of worms. When soil is properly aerated, roots will grow deeply for stronger, more vigorous lawn, crops, and flowers. 

You also get to attract wasps, which feed on cabbage worms that destroy crops. 

4. Promote pollination

Birdbaths can attract butterflies and bees — insects known as excellent pollinators. If you grow fruits, vegetables, and flowers, you’ll want to have a few birdbaths placed in inviting locations in your garden.

5. ReduceD Bird Damage In Your Vegetable Garden

One thing that I have noticed, is that when I keep my birdbaths filled and clean, my vegetable garden suffers less bird damage. When they have plenty to drink in hot weather, for example, they don’t raid my ripening tomatoes nearly as much, if at all. Same goes for my fruit trees, however, with fruit trees there’s always some bird loss from birds if you don’t protect your trees. I don’t mind if the birds get a few, because I always have more colorful birds around my backyard and trees, even in winter.

6. Support kids learning

Nature is beautiful, but, unfortunately, the connection kids have with nature isn’t really that strong as past generations before most people lived in cities and technology took over. By attracting different types of birds, you create an entertaining environment that present kids with a new opportunity to learn valuable lessons. For example, they can learn how to identify different types of birds, their habits, as well as migratory routes

Conclusion

There you have it! With the benefits of birdbaths above, it’s fair to say having one or more in your backyard is worth it.

Related References

Quick Guide to Proper Bird Bath Placement

Sometimes birds have a hard time getting fresh and clean water. A birdbath could come in handy in such instances. It could also be great if you love watching birds. Water has been proven to attract more bird species than feeders. However, getting a birdbath is the first step. You need to place the birdbath properly to ensure it serves its purpose perfectly. Here are some quick bird bath placement tips to consider. 

How to place a birdbath

1.      Place near a window or where you can see/watch birds easily

  • Although you may be getting a birdbath solely for providing birds with clean, fresh, water, you’ll definitely enjoy watching the birds. So, place the birdbath near your field of sight, preferably, somewhere you can see from indoors. This will, of course, depend on the design of your house as well as your tastes and preferences. For instance, if you have outdoor space in your home that you frequent when relaxing, consider placing your birdbath in front of such an area.


2. Place on a pedestal away from predators/danger

  • Birdbaths should be away from areas where cats, among other predators, can hide and pounce on the birds. Ideally, the birdbath should be out in the open and placed on a pedestal where birds can see predators approaching. A pedestal is also a safe distance away from the ground where children can’t reach, and you can see the birdbath easily.

3. Have an escape route

  • Since it’s impossible to eliminate predators, among other things that can scare birds away, you should think about an escape route. The birdbath should be placed where there is a clear line of escape into the sky or nearby branches since wet birds have a shorter flying range. 

4. Locate near a clean and fresh source of water

  • Birdbaths should be near a garden hose. Since one of the reasons for having a birdbath is providing clean and fresh water to birds, a location that is far from your house or a water source isn’t ideal. It should be easy for you to change the water after a few days, even daily during hot weather. A nearby water source also makes cleaning easy. 

5. Consider climate

  • Last, but not least, you need to consider the climate in your area. If you live in northern regions which are generally cold, choose a sunny spot so that the sun can keep the water warm during chilly days. Such a location will also ensure the water doesn’t freeze during winter. If you live in southern regions which are usually hot, consider a spot with some shade to keep the water cool during hot days.

THE BLUEBIRD

Writing and The Written Word

I know the song that the bluebird is singing,
Out in the apple-tree where he is swinging;
Brave little fellow, the skies may look dreary;
Nothing cares he while his heart is so cheery.

Hark! how the music leaps out from his throat,
Hark! was there ever so merry a note?
Listen awhile and you’ll hear what he’s saying,
Up in the apple-tree swinging and swaying.

“Dear little blossoms down under the snow,
You must be weary of winter, I know;
Hark, while I sing you a message of cheer;
Summer is coming and spring-time is here!

“Little white snowdrop! I pray you arise;
Bright yellow crocus! come, open your eyes;
Sweet little violets, hid from the cold,
Put on your mantles of purple and gold;
Daffodils! daffodils! say, do you hear?—
Summer is coming and spring-time is here!”

–Emily Huntington Miller

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THE VIOLET

Writing and The Written Word

Down in a green and shady bed
A modest violet grew;
Its stalk was bent, it hung its head,
As if to hide from view.

And yet it was a lovely flower,
Its colors bright and fair!
It might have graced a rosy bower,
Instead of hiding there.

Yet there it was content to bloom,
In modest tints arrayed;
And there diffused its sweet perfume,
Within the silent shade.

Then let me to the valley go,
This pretty flower to see,
That I may also learn to grow
In sweet humility.

–Jane Taylor

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THE FERN SONG

Writing and The Written Word

THE FERN SONG

Dance to the beat of the rain, little Fern,
And spread out your palms again,
And say, “Tho’ the Sun
Hath my vesture spun,
He hath labored, alas, in vain,
But for the shade
That the Cloud hath made,
And the gift of the Dew and the Rain.”
Then laugh and upturn
All your fronds, little Fern,
And rejoice in the beat of the rain!

John Bannister Tabb

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THE OYSTER

Writing and The Written Word

THE OYSTER

TWO halves of an oyster shell, each a shallow cup;
Here once lived an oyster before they ate him up.
Oyster shells are smooth inside; outside very rough;
Very little room to spare, but he had enough.
Bedroom, parlor, kitchen, or cellar there was none;
Just one room in all the house—oysters need but one.
And he was never troubled by wind or rain or snow,
For he had a roof above, another one below.
I wonder if they fried him, or cooked him in a stew,
And sold him at a fair, and passed him off for two.
I wonder if the oysters all have names like us,
And did he have a name like “John” or “Romulus”?
I wonder if his parents wept to see him go;
I wonder who can tell; perhaps the mermaids know.
I wonder if our sleep the most of…

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How To Grow Cherry Trees

Cherries Hanging Off A Branch
Cherries Hanging Off A Branch

Cherry trees are an excellent choice for your forest garden. Not only will you be treated to a wonderful yield of delicious cherries, but you will also have a beautiful display of blossom in the spring. When you choose the right varieties, cherries can do well in a zone 8 Texan garden. Aside from providing delicious fruit, cherry tree flowers can also be of benefit to insects, especially bees, and help to increase the biodiversity of insect and animal life in your garden.

Flowering Cherry Tree In the Countryside
Flowering Cherry Tree In the Countryside

Choosing a Cherry Tree

It is essential to be aware when choosing a cherry tree that some varieties are sweet and others are sour. Sweet cherries can be eaten raw, and yet it is important to note that not all sweet cherries are self-fertile and many will need a companion tree to bear fruit. Sour cherries generally are self-fertile and will do fine as a single tree.

Planting a Cherry Tree

 Cherry trees prefer deep, fertile and well-drained soil. The soil pH level should be between 6.5-6.7 and full sun.

  • Sweet Cherry trees do not do well as undergrowth situations. Sweet Cherry trees do not like shallow, sandy or waterlogged soil. Bing and Lapins are sweet cherry varieties that can thrive in zone 8.
  • Tart Cherry trees, will tolerate a limited amount of partial shade. Montmorency and North Star are options for sour cherry trees for the region.

 Caring For a Cherry Tree

 Cherry trees will do best when planted between November and March, to the same depth as they were in the pot. Cherry trees should be mulched with organic compost in late February, and if you desire to use commercial fertilizer stakes, this is the time to place the fertilizer stakes just outside the drip line if the cherry tree.

The area around the tree (inside the drip line and a couple of feet outside the drip line) should be well mulched on top of the compost and kept clear of grass and other competing vegetation. It is essential to deep water your cherry trees frequently and keep it well mulched the first couple of years to ensure they thrive.

A guild of comfrey and beneficial herbs and flowers around the base will help cherry trees to become established and keep them healthy.

If you want to shape your cherry tree, then the pruning should be pruned once established during the summer, between late July and the end of August. If you choose to prune be conservative in your pruning and be aware of the type of cherry tree you are pruning:

  • Sweet cherries form on wood that is one year old and older.
  • Tart cherries form almost all their cherries on growth from the previous season. With the tart cherries, you will have to make sure that you get the balance when pruning between one-year-old fruiting wood and new replacement branches.

Harvesting Cherries

The sugar content in sweet cherries increasing dramatically in the final few days of ripening, so it is essential to wait until the fruits are entirely ripe before harvesting. Sour cherries will come off the stem when ripe and ready, while sweet cherries should be tasted to determine whether or not they are ready for harvest. Take care when harvesting not to damage the fruiting wood spur, which will produce more fruit next year. Leave stems intact if you plan to store cherries for any length of time.

Sweet cherries are best eaten straight from the tree, as soon after harvesting as possible, while sour cherries can be cooked into a range of preserves and desserts.

Related References