How to store riced cauliflower?

Riced Cauliflower
Riced Cauliflower

Riced cauliflower once prepared, as a myriad of uses and can be stored for future use. Actually, storing rice cauliflower can be quite a timesaver. The store riced cauliflower, first, divided into portions which you are likely the use. Such as individual servings of ½ cup (100g) portions or multiples thereof according to family size.  For example, for a family of four, a storage portion size of 2 cups may be appropriate. Each individual serving contains contain about 25 calories before other ingredients are added.

Short-term storage

For short-term storage place your riced cauliflower in an airtight container, preferably see-through, and stored in the refrigerator for up to seven days.   This method of storage is recommended if you have a meal plan where you know you will be incorporating it into other meals throughout the week.

Long-term storage

if you made an abundance of riced cauliflower, which you may not be using right away, then freezing it is your best option for long-term storage. Once frozen, rice cauliflower may be stored for up to a year.

How to freeze rice cauliflower

for small batches say, 2 cups or less, simply place the riced cauliflower in a freezer bag lay, lay flat, and freeze. For larger quantities, which you do not wish to break into small portions for freezing, line a cookie sheet with parchment paper and spread the riced cauliflower evenly across the sheet place in the river freezer for rapid freezing. Once frozen, remove cookie sheet and, quickly, place the riced cauliflower in freezer bags of your desired portion size, and return to the freezer.  It is recommended that freezer bags be labeled with the contents and a date they were frozen is added. Adding the description and the date will aid in knowing what is exactly in the bag and facilitate the application of the FIFO method of pantry and freezer stock rotation.

Carrot Soup Recipe

In this day and age, one can find a myriad of recipes online. However, over time many of these recipes have become overly complex and have large ingredient lists. So, here is a quick and easy carrot soup, which makes an excellent meal starter and has the advantage of being an easy weekday recipe.

Not only is it a simple recipe, but has the advantages of:

  • Flexible preparation of the carrots, which can be made with Microwaved, steamed, or boiled carrots
  • Fast preparation, needing only 15 to 30 minutes to prepare, depending upon your carrot cooking method
  • Being able to be made ahead and reheated on low with a modicum of supervision or reheated in the microwave to save time
  • Permitting multi-tasking, because it can be prepared while you cook other dishes
  • Safe storage in the refrigerator for 3 or 4 days before reheating
  • this makes an excellent lunch item if you have a microwave available

Carrot Soup Ingredient list

  • 1 1/2 to 2 cups of carrots
  • 1 1/2 to 2 cups of liquid (milk or broth)
  • 2 tablespoons of bouillon or base (vegetable or chicken ) — Optional
  • 1 tablespoon butter  — Optional
  • Salt — Optional

Carrot Soup Preparation Directions

  • Cook carrot until tender
  • let carrots cool
  • Blend Carrots and Liquid
  • pour into a saucepan
  • Add bouillon and butter
  • Bring to a slow simmer on a medium-low heat
  • Taste and salt to taste, if desired.

Tips

  • Safety Tip: Do not put the carrots in the blender hot
  • Food Safety Tip: If fixed ahead, refrigerate, and do not store more than 4 days before reheating and serving
  • Food Safety Tip: if reheating, heat thoroughly to a light simmer, before serving
  • if you boiled the carrots, you can use the water the carrots were boiled as broth.
  • For cream of carrot soup, using whole milk provides the most nutrition, but skim milk will work
  • If using broth, vegetable or chicken broth usually works best and low sodium broths work just fine.

Related References

Herbs and spices – Bay leaves

Bay Leaf or sweet bay (Laurus nobilis)
Bay Leaf or sweet bay (Laurus nobilis)

Bay leaves add a dimension to a host of soups, sauces, and stews. Bay leaf is, especially, useful in dishes containing chicken, beef, tomato sauces, and stocks.  If you use a Bay leaf, be sure to remove the bay leaves before serving. If you don’t intend to use the leaf whole or in large pieces, then make sure it is a very finely ground when incorporating it into your recipes. If not removed or not finely ground, Bay leaf is tough to chew and detracts from your overall dish quality.

Flavor Characteristics

  • Typically used as whole dry leaves or ground leaves, Bay leaves have a strong flavor. Especially, if whole leaves or torn or crushed.

Usage

  • Bay leaves are used in meat and poultry dishes. Notably, soups pot roast, and stews.
  • Bay leaves are, also, sometimes used in pickles and stuffing for poultry and meat.
  • Frequently, Bay leaves are used as an ingredient in a bouquet garni.
  • Bay leaves are commonly used in Middle Eastern and Mediterranean cooking.

Hibiscus Tea (Agua De Jamaica)

Hibiscus Tea (Agua De Jamaica)
Hibiscus Tea (Agua De Jamaica)

I know this tea from the Mexican with cooking tradition and it is a favorite summertime drink around our home.  The flowers used for Hibiscus tea are easily obtained online or in your local grocery, at least in the Southwest. In the Mexican tradition, it is known as Agua or Water, but it is actually a tea made from the flowers of the Hibiscus plant. While usually drank chilled and/or on ice, it makes a perfectly fine hot beverage, as well.

Hibiscus scarlet colored tea is a flavorful and versatile drink, which can be used in a multitude of ways, including:

  • To add flavor and color to a berry or fruit smoothie, or simply, to thin a smoothie a bit.
  • Frozen to make Popsicles
  • To make colorful ice cubes for your summertime drinks
  • Added to Jell-O for more depth of flavor and or color
  • Added to beery jellies, jams, and other recipes to more depth of flavor and or color. This is especially true of strawberry recipes.

Also Known as:

  • Agua De Jamaica
  • Jamaica Water

Hibiscus tea is very simple, though many recipes make it more complicated than it needs to be.  Basically,  you need the hibiscus flower and water.  A sweeter is strictly optional.  Actually,  to provide maximum flexibility, I recommend you don’t sweeten the tea until the time of consumption.   This allows each individual to sweeten the tea according to their personal tastes and/or needs.  Also, It makes a perfectly fine unsweetened drink, which is my favorite way to drink Hibiscus ice tea.   Also, if you skip the sweeter, it not only keeps it very low calorie,  but it is the most flexible way to allow you in incorporate the tea into other recipes, which may have already been sweetened and/ or don’t need the additional sweeten.

Recipe

Ingredients

Ingredient1 Quart Measure12 Quart MeasureNotes
Hibiscus Flower½ cup1 cup 
Water1 quart2 quartsI use 2 cups for boiling and the remainder cold
Sugar/Sweetener6 tablespoons¾ cupStrictly optional
    

Directions

  • Rinse the flowers quickly to remove dust and debris
  • place flowers in saucepan with 2 cups of water and
  • Bring water with flowers to a boil.
  • Reduce to a slow simmer for ten minutes
  • Permit to cool
  • Strain through a fine wire strainer to remove flowers into a pitcher
  • Add cool water and/or ice according to pitcher size
  • Server Chilled

Related References

Why use applesauce as an oil substitute in baking?

Applesauce
Applesauce

There are three reasons that I use unsweetened applesauce as a substitute for oil in my baking, especially, almost homemade recipes. The reasons are nutrition, texture, and flavor.  Applesauce, in my opinion, adds a lot of character to your baking, especially, in cakes and bread without all the added calories and oil fats.

Another good reason to consider applesauce an oil substitute is the simple fact that you can grow apples in your backyard, garden, and/or orchard.   Healthy applesauce is easy enough to make at home and, if you happen to have enough apples in your backyard, you can make a large quantity, which when canned stores for years.  So, from an Eco-friendly point of view, you don’t need to pay to have large corporations process the oil and shipment it from around the world to get it to your local grocer.

Simply stated even a good olive oil has little in it be on calories fat and some vitamin E.  While it is true, depending on what oil you cook with, your oil may contain some omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, the quantity is so small when compared to the calorie and fat ratio, as not to make it worth adding it into your baking for that purpose alone.

Applesauce, on the other hand, has no fat, add dietary fiber, natural carbohydrates, and sugars; not to mention more flavor.  Oil in cooking is one of American cooking’s most overused ingredients.  It’s used in baking, mostly, to make foods moist.

The table below does a brief comparison of a 1/4 ounce serving of both applesauce and oil:

Nutrition FactsOlive OilApplesauce
Calories48050
Total Fat56g0
Cholesterol00
Sodium025mg
Total carbs012g
Protein00
Vitamin E15%0
Dietary fiber02
Sugar08g

Related References

Celery Alternatives You Can Grow In Your Garden

Celery in the Home Garden

Most home gardeners don’t bother to grow celery and there is good reason for that.  Celery is a, Biennial grown as an annual, long-season crop, which originates from wetlands and, therefore, requires cool, rich, damp soils to grow is finicky and difficult to grow.

Considering this, a small list of alternative which can be grown in the garden with generally less difficulty may be useful. Especially, if you don’t want to completely depend on the grocer.  Here are few alternatives to true celery, which can be used as celery replacement with some accommodation for your families’ tastes and the dish in which they are used.

Angelica (Anglica archangellica)
Angelica (Anglica archangellica)

Angelica (Anglica archangellica)

Angelica (Anglica archangellica) (Hardiness Zone 4 through 9)

Angelica is a biennial (6 to 8 ft tall) plant, whose the second-year stems can be used like celery.  The stems are slightly sweet and can be used as a side dish or in soups and stews.

Cardoon (Cynara cardunculus)
Cardoon (Cynara cardunculus)

Cardoon (Cynara cardunculus)

Cardoon (Cynara cardunculus) (Hardiness Zone 5 through 9)

Cardoon is a perennial (4 to 6 ft tall) plant, whose young chopped leaf stocks may be used like celery in soups, and stews.

Fennel (F. vulgare dulce)
Fennel (F. vulgare dulce)

Fennel

Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) (Hardiness Zone 5 through 9)

Common Fennel is a perennial (3 to 5 ft tall) plant, whose young stems may be used like celery.  The Florence Fennel bulb is, also, popular as a vegetable for salads and soups.

Lovage (Levisticum officinale)
Lovage (Levisticum officinale)

Lovage (Levisticum officinale)

Lovage (Levisticum officinale) (Hardiness Zone 3 through 8)

Lovage is a perennial (3 to 9 ft tall) plant, which vaguely resembles its cousin celery in appearance and in flavor.  Lovage is much easier to grow than celery and is every bit as tasty.

Rhubarb (Rheum rhabarbarum)
Rhubarb (Rheum rhabarbarum)

Rhubarb (Rheum rhabarbarum)

Rhubarb (Rheum rhabarbarum) (Hardiness Zone 3 through 8)

Now, Rhubarb (sometimes called the” pie plant”) may not be an obvious choice, the the stocks early in the season, with their tart character, can make an excellent replacement for Celery in strongly sauced dishes.  Especially, dishes, which use a sauce with a sweet undertone or which are after the contrasting flavors of sweet and tart.

Related References

What Are Hardiness Zones?

USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map, What Are Hardiness Zones
USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map

The Plant Hardiness Zones are defined by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). The USDA map, which map is based on the average annual minimum winter temperatures, and is the generally accepted standard in the United States by gardeners, farmers, growers and sales of seeds and plants can determine which plants are most likely survive and be productive in an area.

USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Hardiness Zone Map

Specific details regarding the map can be obtained on the USDA site at:

  • Find Your Plant Hardiness Zone