My Spring Vegetable Garden – 2017

2017 Spring Vegetable Garden
2017 Spring Vegetable Garden

My spring vegetable garden for this year is well underway.  Actually, this past weekend end I have begun harvesting zucchini and bell peppers from the grade.   So, I thought it might be useful to have a list of what I planted this spring.

Vegetables which I grow every year

  • Malabar spinach; on trellises, of course
  • A variety of Chile plants
    • Poblano (Chile Ancho); our favorite eating Chile
    • Bell Peppers (red and yellows); for mixing with the poblanos, salad greens, and to add color
    • Mild jalapeno; for a bit of Chile bite in some dishes and for some garden as they ripen
  • Butternut Winter squash; my own medium variety this year.
  • Old Time Tennessee melon; a large cantaloupe style, which has become a favorite with us in recent years.
  • Tomatoes; only cherry and yellow pear tomatoes this year
  • Green Tomatillos
  • Herbs
    • Fennel; re-growing from last year’s root, which overwintered, and the bulbs are just about large enough to harvest
    • Garden sage
    • Bee Balm
    • Chives
    • Peppermint
  • Pole beans (Portuguese); my own collection, which is not commercially available any longer.
  • Tepary beans; my own variety, which I have been improving over the years. Needs minimal water and thrive in the San Antonio climate

Vegetables which I grow occasionally

  • Egg Plants
  • Zucchini Squash; green and yellow.
  • Runner beans (Ayocote Morado); good eating, but mostly growing for the hummingbirds and the bumblebees
  • Worchester Lima bean; seems to love and thrive in the San Antonio climate
  • Beets (Detroit Dark Red); grown specifically for salad green this year.
  • Armenian cucumber; grows well in Sana Antonio and is great eating when picked small
  • Purple potatoes; plant in a no-dig method using some old large flower pots

Perennial – Yarrow (Achillea millefolium)

Perennial, Yarrow (Achillea millefolium)
Yarrow (Achillea millefolium)

This herb plant was first used by ancient Greeks over 3,000 years ago. Largely used for medicinal purposes.  Yarrow is also, sometimes, used as an ornamental flower and as a companion plant.  Yarrow has Fern-like, finely divided leaves. Has tiny florets, about 4 inches wide, which depending upon the variety may be white, yellow, cerise, and red.

Hardiness

  • Perennial

Location

  • Full sun

Habit

  • Upright with some side growth
  • About 18 -24 inches’ height and about the same in width.

Use

  • In dried flower arrangements
  • As a compost simulator
  • Companion plant near aromatic herbs to enhance the production of essential oils.

Cautions

  • May cause an allergic reaction if taken internally.

Attracts

  • Butterflies

Requirements

  • Select a site with full sun and very well-drained soil. Yarrow thrives in hot, dry conditions and low soil fertility, but won’t tolerate wet soils.

When to plant

  • Sow seeds in fall or spring

Season

  • Foliage will appear with warm weather and may bloom from spring until the fall frost.

Related References

Climatic Considerations for Winter Squash and Pumpkins

Climatic Considerations for Winter Squash and Pumpkins, c. pepo, c. maxima, c. moschata, C. argyrosperma, C. mixta
Pumpkins Outdoors in Fall

Squash is a warm-season crop. It should not be planted until the danger of frost is past. In the list below, note the species from which each variety has been selected. Some do better in certain climates and have different growing season lengths.

  • C. argyrosperma and C. mixta grow best in hot arid climates like the Southwest United States
  • C. maxima grow best in cooler northern climates, especially along coastal areas of large lakes or oceans where the growing temperature may be more consistent
  • C. moschata are best grown in southern humid climates
  • C. pepo does best in areas in climates which provide even rainfalls and temperature ranges, such as, coastal regions and the midwestern United States.

Related References