Recipe – Spaghetti Sԛuash Rеd Sаuсе

whether working with the spaghetti squash from your garden or recently purchased from the store this recipe makes a nice weeknight recipe. Because this spaghetti squash recipe uses only the stovetop and the microwave it doesn’t add a lot of heat to the house, so, it can be a year-round family favorite.

Ingredients

  • 1 onion diсеd
  • 1 tsp. оlivе oil
  • 1 plum tomato, seeded and diсеd
  • 1 сuр tomato sauce
  • ¾ tѕр.. orеgano
  • ½ tѕр. salt
  • ¼ tѕр. рерреr
  • 1 lаrgе spaghetti squash, about 5 pounds
  • ¼ сuр Parmesan cheese

Directions

  • In a nonstick ѕkillеt, sauté onion in оil until tranѕluсеnt, about 10 minutes. Add tomato, tomato ѕаuсе, oregano, salt, and рерреr and ѕimmеr over low hеat for 30 minutеѕ.
  • Mеanwhilе, hаlvе spaghetti squash lеngthwisе, and rеmоvе seeds. Cover еасh hаlf with microwave-safe cellophane wrap for cooking, leaving 1 сornеr еxроѕеd. Miсrоwаvе, cut side up, on a plate on high power for 8 minutеѕ. Sԛuash should ѕераratе easily into ѕtrandѕ when donе.
  • Sсrаре out flesh and рlасе in an lаrgе mixing bowl. Mix in tomato ѕаuсе and season to tastе. Dividе into ѕix 2/3-сuр portions and top еасh with 1 tаblеѕроon Pаrmеѕan. Or, if you like you can lay the spaghetti squash out and apply on a platter and cover it with a tomato sauce making the Parmesan available for each to serve their own when they take their helping.

Servings

  • Makes about six servings

How To Stream A Pumpkin Or Winter Squash

Winter Squash In Steamer
Winter Squash In Steamer

Steaming winters squash is my most used method of preparing winter squash.  I find it quick, easy, and once streamed, the squash is easily used.

Kitchen Equipment

  • A streamer—for large squashes I repurpose my pasta pan.
  • A pair of tongs
  • A large metal spoon – Usually use a large tablespoon, but any strong large metal spoon will do fine.
  • A scrap bowl to keep the bits and pieces out of the way, until you are ready to deal with them.
  • A kitchen Cleaver to cut the squash
  • A cutting board
  • A table fork

How To Prepare The Squash Or Pumpkin For Streaming

  • Wash the exterior of the squash to remove any debris
  • On a cutting board, use the Clever to remove a small quantity from both ends
Trimmed End Of Winter Squash
Trimmed End Of Winter Squash
  • Slice the squash lengthwise on both side to its center
Winter Squash Cut Lengthwise
Winter Squash Cut Lengthwise
  • Scrape out seeds and membranes set aside.
Using Spoon To remove Seeds and Membranes
Using Spoon To remove Seeds and Membranes
  • Measure the depth of your steamer and cut both halves into lengths slightly shorter, so, the squash will fit into your streamer.
  • Cut each section lengthwise down the center, effectively quartering large quash. If you are dealing with a smaller squash you may want to leave it in halves, if they are not too large. For very large squash you may need to cut them into more section.  The goal is to get them to fit and to be in roughly equal size chunks.

How To Steam Your Winter Squash

  • Add water to just below, an inch or so, the base of your stream insert
  • Fill your stream with the first batch, loosely pack so the stream can circulate easily
Winter Squash Loosely Loaded Into Streamer
Winter Squash Loosely Loaded Into Streamer
  • Cover and turn on high
  • Once the stream is flowing, reduce to a medium or medium-low heat
  • Let the squash steam for a few minutes. This can vary depending on the thickness of the flesh of the squash.  For thick squash 15 minutes for thinner squash 10 minutes, then start checking your squash for doneness every few minutes.
  • Test with a table fork, when the fork can be inserted easily through the flesh to the outer shell of the squash you squash is done
Testing With Fork For Doneness
Testing With Fork For Doneness
  • Turn off and let cool. I’m usually working with large winter, so, I use tongs to move the squash to a heat tolerant bowl or pan to cool while I fill my steamer and cook the next batch.
Using Metal Tongs To Move squash to a cooling Bowl or Plate
Using Metal Tongs To Move squash to a cooling Bowl or Plate
  • Once cool, use a metal spoon to remove the flesh from the outer shell and place in a container of your choice.
Separating Flesh from Shell With A Spoon
Separating Flesh from Shell With A Spoon

Caution:  Stream squash is extremely hot and can burn you, as can the steam. So, be careful and let the squash cool before handling and don’t get in too big of a rush to start removing the flesh from the shell.

Uses of Steamed Squash

  • Steamed squash is very useful and can be used in any number of ways, such as soups, pies, bread, cakes, and/or mash. It can be added to other dishes like macaroni and cheese (and other dishes) as a partial cheese substitute.
  • Also, it can be added to dog food in moderation to provide fiber and added nutrition. We are giving it to our dogs, we like to add some home-grown yogurt too for added flavor and benefit for our dogs. By the way, we check with our vet and she recommends adding some squash to a dog’s diet.

Storage Of Steamed Squash

  • In the refrigerator steamed squash can be stored for three or four days before used.
  • Once cooled streamed winter squash can be placed in freezer containers and frozen for up to a year. Keep in that it will come out of the freeze and be watery, but it perfectly usable.
  • Streamed winter squash can also be canned, if care is taken, and stored in your pantry or cellar up to three years.

How Not To Waste The Scraps

There are several ways to take advantage of the squash scraps. Among them are:

  • Roasting the seeds for a snack and other uses
  • If you are a gardener, growing non-hybrid seed (and/or grow no other variety which could cross breed), you can dry the seeds and use them for a future
  • Composting the scraps to make a garden soil additive
  • If you happen to have livestock, feed it to them, they will love it. Especially, chickens, cattle, and pigs.

Related References

My Last Winter Squash Harvest Of 2017

Golden Butternut Squash
Golden Butternut Squash

2017 was that second time in the six years that we have lived in this house where I have picked that last of my winter squash in December. In this case, December 7, 2017.  I always leave the last few winter squash for picking at the last possible moment to get as many full ripe fruits as possible.  Fortunately, I was watching my iPhone and thought the night get colder than I would like and did not want to risk my squash to a frost any longer. So, I went out into the rain and harvested my last four golden butternut squashes from my vegetable garden.  As you can see in the picture about where they are still wet from the rain.  In all, it was 42 pounds of ripe butternut squash.

Snowing in San Anontio, TX December 7th 2017.
Snowing in San Antonio, TX December 7th, 2017.

It was a good thing I did because it was snowing a couple hours later, not a common thing here in San Antonio, Texas.

I’m a little slow getting this post, but as it happens, I’m cooking one of them, smaller for seed, ten pounders today, which got me thinking about the December harvest.

Winter Squash – Waltham Butternut

Young Waltham Butternut Squash
Young Waltham Butternut Squash

A popular winter storage squash of excellent quality. A prolific, easy to grow, delicious butternut with improved fruit uniformity and increased yields. Interior is thick rich sweet yellow-orange flesh with a nutty flavor.  A 1970 All-America Selection (AAS) seed-industry award winner. Grows well in the southern U.S.A.

Classification

  • Winter Squash

Days To Maturity

  • 80-110

Fruit Size

  • average 8” to 12″ long and 3” to 5” inches in width

Weight

  • 3-5 pounds

Skin Color

  • smooth light-Buff/Tan

Habit

  • Vines grow to 6 feet, producing 4-5 squash per plant.

Seed Planting Depth

  • 1 inch

Seeds Per group

  • 6-8

Seed Spacing Within A Group

  • 3 inches

Spacing Between Hills

  • 4-6 feet

Day To Germination

  • 10-14 days

Thin To (Plants Per Hill)

  • 2-3 plants

Heirloom

  • No

Year Introduced

  • 1970

Species

  • Cucurbita

Genus

  • Moschata

 Resistance

  • Excellent resistance to vine borers.

Usage

  • Edible – Excellent food qualities

Storage

  • Good Keeper

Space Saver

  • Pick young and small to use as summer squash

Related References

Winter Squash – Sweet Dumpling

Winter Squash, Sweet Dumpling (C.Pepo)
Winter Squash, Sweet Dumpling (C.Pepo)

Sweet Dumpling is a very sweet, tender orange flesh and a acornish shape with ivory skin with dark green stripes. The Sweet dumpling has pale orange flesh About the perfect size for having and filling with a meat stuffing for a nice two-person meal starter.

Species

Cucurbita

Genus

Pepo

Classification

Squash

Family

Acorn

Days To Maturity

100-110 days

Fruit Size

A small to medium sized squash ranging in diameter from 5 to 7 inches.

Weight

¾ to 1 lb

Skin Color

Ivory skin with dark green stripes

Habit

Medium length vines

Seed Depth

½ – 1″

Seeds Per group

4 -6

Seed Spacing

6″

Space Between Hills

4 – 6′

Day To Germination

7 – 14

Thin To (Plants Per hill)

2

Year Introduced

1976

Heirloom

No

Resistance

Unknown

Usage

Edible – Very good food qualities

Storage

Good Keeper

Space Saver

Can be planted in your landscaping or in a very large pot.  Also, can be grown vertically.

Substitution

substitutes for Acorn or carnival

Related References

Almost Homemade – Golden Bread

Almost Homemade Golden Yeast Bread from Bread Machine, pumpkin, sweet potato, winter squash
Almost Homemade Golden Yeast Bread from Bread Machine

This is a really handy way to use up a small quantity of leftover pumpkin, winter squash, or sweet potato.  As it happens, this approach also increases the fiber and nutrition of the standard white bread recipe a smidgen.

In this example of almost homemade bread, I start with a standard white bread mix for a bread machine, but you could use something else, like Hawaiian bread mix, and it should work fine.

The idea here is to use up some leftover vegetables/fruit in a way which others will eat it, definitely, not attempting to duplicate the taste or texture of the classic pumpkin or sweet potato quick bread.   You certainly can intentionally cook a small pumpkin, winter squash, and/or sweet potato and use this approach, as well.

This recipe intentionally named to obfuscate the fact that you are using pumpkin and/or sweet potato.  Otherwise, you inevitably get the ‘I like the other style of pumpkin bread’ statement.  Actually, the finished loaf just tastes like bread, not pumpkin.

To use this approach, simply, adds some unseasoned and unsweetened, cooked, mashed, pumpkin and/or sweet potato (steamed or baked is fine) according to you loaf size;  no additional seasoning is required.

Pumpkin and/or Sweet Potato Quantity by Loaf Size

 

1 Pound Loaf

1 ½ pound Loaf

2 Pound Loaf

Pumpkin and/or Sweet Potato

1/3 cup2/3 cup¾ cup

You may make other substitutions and/or other ingredients as well if you are careful.  As a matter of fact, the picture above has seeds added for a bit of crunch.

Load Your Bread Machine

  • Generally, this is done adding the liquids first, followed by the dry ingredients, and yeast last. Following this order keeps the yeast separate from the liquid ingredients until the kneading cycle begins. However, you may check your owner’s manual and use the order recommended specifically for your machine.

Bread Machine Cook Cycle

  • Set your bread machine for a for the appropriate loaf size, crust darkness, white bread setting, and start the baking process. The basic or white bread cycle, typically, takes 3 to 4 hours and intended for use with many simple bread recipes.

Related Reference

Growing Winter Squash and Pumpkins Vertically

Winter Squash Grown Vertically
Winter Squash Grown Vertically

Growing winter squash and pumpkins vertically can save garden space and help to fight pests.  To grow squash vertically, here a few simple tips to follow:

  • Choosing the correct seed is the best place to begin. To grow squash Vertically choose squash that has a vining habit (sometimes called trailing) and produce small fruit; two pounds or less is recommended. Growing squash that can grow to a hundred pounds or more would be hard to accommodate when building the structure to be climbed and would break from the vines before mature.
  • Site and climbing structure should be properly prepared. The climbing structure should be strong enough to withstand strong winds and the weight of the squash as they reach maturity.
  • The soil needs to be well worked and mounded to allow soil based watering methods, such as trench or soaker hose and provides adequate drainage.
  • The grooming method needs to be adapted to encourage the growth of several small fruits. Many gardeners recommend removing fruit and leaving only one or two on each vine; thus, encouraging a few large fruits.  When growing vertically we want to encourage the growth of numerous small fruit, which will be less likely to tear the vines down or fall off the vine.
  • As squash grow larger and providing additional support for the fruit may be desirable to prevent the fruit from tearing themselves from the vine before mature or falling to earth and breaking or being bruised.
  • With some early maturing varieties picking of fruit may be necessary as the fruit becomes fully mature to reduce weight in the vine and to encourage the vine to produce more fruit. Care should be taken to ensure the fruit is fully mature.